Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Seasonal influenza vaccination of healthcare workers: systematic review of qualitative evidence.
BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Nov 15; 17(1):732.BH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Most countries recommend that healthcare workers (HCWs) are vaccinated seasonally against influenza in order to protect themselves and patients. However, in many cases coverage remains low. A range of strategies have been implemented to increase uptake. Qualitative evidence can help in understanding the context of interventions, including why interventions may fail to achieve the desired effect. This study aimed to synthesise evidence on HCWs' perceptions and experiences of vaccination for seasonal influenza.

METHODS

Systematic review of qualitative evidence. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL and included English-language studies which reported substantive qualitative data on the vaccination of HCWs for seasonal influenza. Findings were synthesised thematically.

RESULTS

Twenty-five studies were included in the review. HCWs may be motivated to accept vaccination to protect themselves and their patients against infection. However, a range of beliefs may act as barriers to vaccine uptake, including concerns about side-effects, scepticism about vaccine effectiveness, and the belief that influenza is not a serious illness. HCWs value their autonomy and professional responsibility in making decisions about vaccination. The implementation of interventions to promote vaccination uptake may face barriers both from HCWs' personal beliefs and from the relationships between management and employees within the targeted organisations.

CONCLUSIONS

HCWs' vaccination behaviour needs to be understood in the context of HCWs' relationships with each other, with management and with patients. Interventions to promote vaccination should take into account both the individual beliefs of targeted HCWs and the organisational context within which they are implemented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK. theo.lorenc@york.ac.uk.Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.Evidence for Policy and Practice Information and Co-ordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre), Social Science Research Unit, UCL Institute of Education, University College London, 18 Woburn Square, London, WC1H 0NR, UK.Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29141619

Citation

Lorenc, Theo, et al. "Seasonal Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers: Systematic Review of Qualitative Evidence." BMC Health Services Research, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, p. 732.
Lorenc T, Marshall D, Wright K, et al. Seasonal influenza vaccination of healthcare workers: systematic review of qualitative evidence. BMC Health Serv Res. 2017;17(1):732.
Lorenc, T., Marshall, D., Wright, K., Sutcliffe, K., & Sowden, A. (2017). Seasonal influenza vaccination of healthcare workers: systematic review of qualitative evidence. BMC Health Services Research, 17(1), 732. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-017-2703-4
Lorenc T, et al. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers: Systematic Review of Qualitative Evidence. BMC Health Serv Res. 2017 Nov 15;17(1):732. PubMed PMID: 29141619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Seasonal influenza vaccination of healthcare workers: systematic review of qualitative evidence. AU - Lorenc,Theo, AU - Marshall,David, AU - Wright,Kath, AU - Sutcliffe,Katy, AU - Sowden,Amanda, Y1 - 2017/11/15/ PY - 2017/02/02/received PY - 2017/11/07/accepted PY - 2017/11/17/entrez PY - 2017/11/17/pubmed PY - 2018/7/3/medline KW - Healthcare workers KW - Influenza KW - Qualitative research KW - Systematic review KW - Vaccination SP - 732 EP - 732 JF - BMC health services research JO - BMC Health Serv Res VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Most countries recommend that healthcare workers (HCWs) are vaccinated seasonally against influenza in order to protect themselves and patients. However, in many cases coverage remains low. A range of strategies have been implemented to increase uptake. Qualitative evidence can help in understanding the context of interventions, including why interventions may fail to achieve the desired effect. This study aimed to synthesise evidence on HCWs' perceptions and experiences of vaccination for seasonal influenza. METHODS: Systematic review of qualitative evidence. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL and included English-language studies which reported substantive qualitative data on the vaccination of HCWs for seasonal influenza. Findings were synthesised thematically. RESULTS: Twenty-five studies were included in the review. HCWs may be motivated to accept vaccination to protect themselves and their patients against infection. However, a range of beliefs may act as barriers to vaccine uptake, including concerns about side-effects, scepticism about vaccine effectiveness, and the belief that influenza is not a serious illness. HCWs value their autonomy and professional responsibility in making decisions about vaccination. The implementation of interventions to promote vaccination uptake may face barriers both from HCWs' personal beliefs and from the relationships between management and employees within the targeted organisations. CONCLUSIONS: HCWs' vaccination behaviour needs to be understood in the context of HCWs' relationships with each other, with management and with patients. Interventions to promote vaccination should take into account both the individual beliefs of targeted HCWs and the organisational context within which they are implemented. SN - 1472-6963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29141619/Seasonal_influenza_vaccination_of_healthcare_workers:_systematic_review_of_qualitative_evidence_ L2 - https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-017-2703-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -