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Health claims and product endorsements on child-oriented beverages in Guatemala.
Public Health Nutr. 2018 02; 21(3):627-631.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We sought to describe front-of-package marketing strategies and nutritional quality of child-oriented beverages in Guatemala.

DESIGN

We purchased all child-oriented ready-to-drink fruit drinks, milks and carbonated beverages in three convenience stores and one supermarket in Guatemala City. Front-of-package marketing was defined as the presence of spokes-characters, cartoons, celebrities, or health-related images, words, claims or endorsements on beverage packaging. We used the UK Nutrition Profiling Model (NPM) to classify beverages as healthy or less healthy.

SETTING

Guatemala City, Guatemala.

RESULTS

We purchased eighty-nine beverages; most were fruit drinks (n 52, 58 %), milk (15, 17 %), carbonated beverages (5, 17 %), rice/soya products (5, 6·0 %), water (1, 1 %) and energy drinks (1, 1 %). Two-thirds (57, 64 %) had health claims. Of those with a nutrition facts label (85, 96 %), nearly all (76, 89 %) were classified as less healthy. No association between the presence of health claims and NPM score (P=0·26) was found. Eight beverages had health-related endorsements. However, only one beverage was classified as healthy.

CONCLUSIONS

In this sample of beverages in Guatemala City, health claims and health-related endorsements are used to promote beverages with poor nutritional quality. Our data support evidence-based policies to regulate the use of front-of-package health claims and endorsements based on nutritional quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine,St. Louis,MO,USA.2Cardiovascular Surgery Unit of Guatemala,9 Ave. 8-00 zone 11,Guatemala City,Guatemala, 01011.2Cardiovascular Surgery Unit of Guatemala,9 Ave. 8-00 zone 11,Guatemala City,Guatemala, 01011.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29143691

Citation

Perry, Andrew, et al. "Health Claims and Product Endorsements On Child-oriented Beverages in Guatemala." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 3, 2018, pp. 627-631.
Perry A, Chacon V, Barnoya J. Health claims and product endorsements on child-oriented beverages in Guatemala. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(3):627-631.
Perry, A., Chacon, V., & Barnoya, J. (2018). Health claims and product endorsements on child-oriented beverages in Guatemala. Public Health Nutrition, 21(3), 627-631. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017003123
Perry A, Chacon V, Barnoya J. Health Claims and Product Endorsements On Child-oriented Beverages in Guatemala. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(3):627-631. PubMed PMID: 29143691.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Health claims and product endorsements on child-oriented beverages in Guatemala. AU - Perry,Andrew, AU - Chacon,Violeta, AU - Barnoya,Joaquin, Y1 - 2017/11/16/ PY - 2017/11/17/pubmed PY - 2019/2/1/medline PY - 2017/11/17/entrez KW - Health-related endorsements KW - Lower-middle-income country KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 627 EP - 631 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We sought to describe front-of-package marketing strategies and nutritional quality of child-oriented beverages in Guatemala. DESIGN: We purchased all child-oriented ready-to-drink fruit drinks, milks and carbonated beverages in three convenience stores and one supermarket in Guatemala City. Front-of-package marketing was defined as the presence of spokes-characters, cartoons, celebrities, or health-related images, words, claims or endorsements on beverage packaging. We used the UK Nutrition Profiling Model (NPM) to classify beverages as healthy or less healthy. SETTING: Guatemala City, Guatemala. RESULTS: We purchased eighty-nine beverages; most were fruit drinks (n 52, 58 %), milk (15, 17 %), carbonated beverages (5, 17 %), rice/soya products (5, 6·0 %), water (1, 1 %) and energy drinks (1, 1 %). Two-thirds (57, 64 %) had health claims. Of those with a nutrition facts label (85, 96 %), nearly all (76, 89 %) were classified as less healthy. No association between the presence of health claims and NPM score (P=0·26) was found. Eight beverages had health-related endorsements. However, only one beverage was classified as healthy. CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of beverages in Guatemala City, health claims and health-related endorsements are used to promote beverages with poor nutritional quality. Our data support evidence-based policies to regulate the use of front-of-package health claims and endorsements based on nutritional quality. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29143691/Health_claims_and_product_endorsements_on_child_oriented_beverages_in_Guatemala_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -