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Behavioral, climatic, and environmental risk factors for Zika and Chikungunya virus infections in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16.
PLoS One. 2017; 12(11):e0188002.Plos

Abstract

The burden of arboviruses in the Americas is high and may result in long-term sequelae with infants disabled by Zika virus infection (ZIKV) and arthritis caused by infection with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). We aimed to identify environmental drivers of arbovirus epidemics to predict where the next epidemics will occur and prioritize municipalities for vector control and eventual vaccination. We screened sera and urine samples (n = 10,459) from residents of 48 municipalities in the state of Rio de Janeiro for CHIKV, dengue virus (DENV), and ZIKV by molecular PCR diagnostics. Further, we assessed the spatial pattern of arbovirus incidence at the municipal and neighborhood scales and the timing of epidemics and major rainfall events. Lab-confirmed cases included 1,717 infections with ZIKV (43.8%) and 2,170 with CHIKV (55.4%) and only 29 (<1%) with DENV. ZIKV incidence was greater in neighborhoods with little access to municipal water infrastructure (r = -0.47, p = 1.2x10-8). CHIKV incidence was weakly correlated with urbanization (r = 0.2, p = 0.02). Rains began in October 2015 and were followed one month later by the largest wave of ZIKV epidemic. ZIKV cases markedly declined in February 2016, which coincided with the start of a CHIKV outbreak. Rainfall predicted ZIKV and CHIKV with a lead time of 3 weeks each time. The association between rainfall and epidemics reflects vector ecology as the larval stages of Aedes aegypti require pools of water to develop. The temporal dynamics of ZIKV and CHIKV may be explained by the shorter incubation period of the viruses in the mosquito vector; 2 days for CHIKV versus 10 days for ZIKV.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Universidade Estadual de São Paulo, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil.Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Foundation for Professional Development, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa.David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.Biomedical Research Institute of Southern California, Oceanside, California, United States of America.Instituto Nacional de Infectologia Evandro Chagas, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.Laboratorio de Referência de Flavivirus, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.David Geffen UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29145452

Citation

Fuller, Trevon L., et al. "Behavioral, Climatic, and Environmental Risk Factors for Zika and Chikungunya Virus Infections in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16." PloS One, vol. 12, no. 11, 2017, pp. e0188002.
Fuller TL, Calvet G, Genaro Estevam C, et al. Behavioral, climatic, and environmental risk factors for Zika and Chikungunya virus infections in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16. PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0188002.
Fuller, T. L., Calvet, G., Genaro Estevam, C., Rafael Angelo, J., Abiodun, G. J., Halai, U. A., De Santis, B., Carvalho Sequeira, P., Machado Araujo, E., Alves Sampaio, S., Lima de Mendonça, M. C., Fabri, A., Ribeiro, R. M., Harrigan, R., Smith, T. B., Raja Gabaglia, C., Brasil, P., Bispo de Filippis, A. M., & Nielsen-Saines, K. (2017). Behavioral, climatic, and environmental risk factors for Zika and Chikungunya virus infections in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16. PloS One, 12(11), e0188002. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0188002
Fuller TL, et al. Behavioral, Climatic, and Environmental Risk Factors for Zika and Chikungunya Virus Infections in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16. PLoS One. 2017;12(11):e0188002. PubMed PMID: 29145452.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral, climatic, and environmental risk factors for Zika and Chikungunya virus infections in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2015-16. AU - Fuller,Trevon L, AU - Calvet,Guilherme, AU - Genaro Estevam,Camila, AU - Rafael Angelo,Jussara, AU - Abiodun,Gbenga J, AU - Halai,Umme-Aiman, AU - De Santis,Bianca, AU - Carvalho Sequeira,Patricia, AU - Machado Araujo,Eliane, AU - Alves Sampaio,Simone, AU - Lima de Mendonça,Marco Cesar, AU - Fabri,Allison, AU - Ribeiro,Rita Maria, AU - Harrigan,Ryan, AU - Smith,Thomas B, AU - Raja Gabaglia,Claudia, AU - Brasil,Patrícia, AU - Bispo de Filippis,Ana Maria, AU - Nielsen-Saines,Karin, Y1 - 2017/11/16/ PY - 2017/08/18/received PY - 2017/10/30/accepted PY - 2017/11/18/entrez PY - 2017/11/18/pubmed PY - 2017/12/27/medline SP - e0188002 EP - e0188002 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 12 IS - 11 N2 - The burden of arboviruses in the Americas is high and may result in long-term sequelae with infants disabled by Zika virus infection (ZIKV) and arthritis caused by infection with Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). We aimed to identify environmental drivers of arbovirus epidemics to predict where the next epidemics will occur and prioritize municipalities for vector control and eventual vaccination. We screened sera and urine samples (n = 10,459) from residents of 48 municipalities in the state of Rio de Janeiro for CHIKV, dengue virus (DENV), and ZIKV by molecular PCR diagnostics. Further, we assessed the spatial pattern of arbovirus incidence at the municipal and neighborhood scales and the timing of epidemics and major rainfall events. Lab-confirmed cases included 1,717 infections with ZIKV (43.8%) and 2,170 with CHIKV (55.4%) and only 29 (<1%) with DENV. ZIKV incidence was greater in neighborhoods with little access to municipal water infrastructure (r = -0.47, p = 1.2x10-8). CHIKV incidence was weakly correlated with urbanization (r = 0.2, p = 0.02). Rains began in October 2015 and were followed one month later by the largest wave of ZIKV epidemic. ZIKV cases markedly declined in February 2016, which coincided with the start of a CHIKV outbreak. Rainfall predicted ZIKV and CHIKV with a lead time of 3 weeks each time. The association between rainfall and epidemics reflects vector ecology as the larval stages of Aedes aegypti require pools of water to develop. The temporal dynamics of ZIKV and CHIKV may be explained by the shorter incubation period of the viruses in the mosquito vector; 2 days for CHIKV versus 10 days for ZIKV. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29145452/Behavioral_climatic_and_environmental_risk_factors_for_Zika_and_Chikungunya_virus_infections_in_Rio_de_Janeiro_Brazil_2015_16_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0188002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -