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The impact of price and nutrition labelling on sugary drink purchases: Results from an experimental marketplace study.
Appetite. 2018 Feb 01; 121:129-137.A

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the effect of front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labelling and sugary drink taxation on consumer beverage purchases.

METHODS

A total of 675 respondents aged 16 years and older participated in an experimental marketplace study using a 4 × 5 within-between group design. Participants were randomised to one of four labelling conditions (no label; star rating; high sugar symbol; health warning) and completed five within-subject purchase tasks. Beverage prices in each task corresponded to 'tax' conditions: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and a variable tax proportional to free sugar level. In each task, participants selected from 20 commercially available beverages; upon conclusion, one of five selections was randomly chosen for purchase.

RESULTS

As price increased, participants were significantly less likely to select a sugary drink, and selected drinks with fewer calories and less free sugar (p < 0.001 for all). The overall effect of labelling was not statistically significant, although there was a trend for the 'high sugar' label to reduce the likelihood of selecting a sugary drink (p = 0.11) and encouraging participants to select drinks with less free sugar (p = 0.11).

CONCLUSIONS

Increasing price was associated with reduced sugary drink purchases. Enhanced FOP labelling results highlight the need for further research to investigate their potential impact. The study adds empirical support for taxation to reduce sugary drink consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada.School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada. Electronic address: dhammond@uwaterloo.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29146460

Citation

Acton, Rachel B., and David Hammond. "The Impact of Price and Nutrition Labelling On Sugary Drink Purchases: Results From an Experimental Marketplace Study." Appetite, vol. 121, 2018, pp. 129-137.
Acton RB, Hammond D. The impact of price and nutrition labelling on sugary drink purchases: Results from an experimental marketplace study. Appetite. 2018;121:129-137.
Acton, R. B., & Hammond, D. (2018). The impact of price and nutrition labelling on sugary drink purchases: Results from an experimental marketplace study. Appetite, 121, 129-137. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2017.11.089
Acton RB, Hammond D. The Impact of Price and Nutrition Labelling On Sugary Drink Purchases: Results From an Experimental Marketplace Study. Appetite. 2018 Feb 1;121:129-137. PubMed PMID: 29146460.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of price and nutrition labelling on sugary drink purchases: Results from an experimental marketplace study. AU - Acton,Rachel B, AU - Hammond,David, Y1 - 2017/11/13/ PY - 2017/04/20/received PY - 2017/11/06/revised PY - 2017/11/09/accepted PY - 2017/11/18/pubmed PY - 2018/8/10/medline PY - 2017/11/18/entrez KW - Added sugar KW - Food labeling KW - Food policy KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages KW - Taxation SP - 129 EP - 137 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 121 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the effect of front-of-package (FOP) nutrition labelling and sugary drink taxation on consumer beverage purchases. METHODS: A total of 675 respondents aged 16 years and older participated in an experimental marketplace study using a 4 × 5 within-between group design. Participants were randomised to one of four labelling conditions (no label; star rating; high sugar symbol; health warning) and completed five within-subject purchase tasks. Beverage prices in each task corresponded to 'tax' conditions: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30% and a variable tax proportional to free sugar level. In each task, participants selected from 20 commercially available beverages; upon conclusion, one of five selections was randomly chosen for purchase. RESULTS: As price increased, participants were significantly less likely to select a sugary drink, and selected drinks with fewer calories and less free sugar (p < 0.001 for all). The overall effect of labelling was not statistically significant, although there was a trend for the 'high sugar' label to reduce the likelihood of selecting a sugary drink (p = 0.11) and encouraging participants to select drinks with less free sugar (p = 0.11). CONCLUSIONS: Increasing price was associated with reduced sugary drink purchases. Enhanced FOP labelling results highlight the need for further research to investigate their potential impact. The study adds empirical support for taxation to reduce sugary drink consumption. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29146460/The_impact_of_price_and_nutrition_labelling_on_sugary_drink_purchases:_Results_from_an_experimental_marketplace_study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -