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Nurses' professional stigma and attitudes towards postpartum women with severe mental illness.
J Clin Nurs 2018; 27(7-8):1543-1551JC

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

To examine professional stigma and attitudes of parenthood towards postpartum women with severe mental illness and the association between postpartum nurses' attitudes and nursing interventions that promote motherhood.

BACKGROUND

Stigma and attitudes towards parenthood of women with severe mental illness may influence nurses' clinical practices.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional, mixed methods.

METHODS

The Stigma among Health Professionals towards People with Severe Mental Illness, Attitudes towards Parenthood among People with Severe Mental Illness and Nursing Interventions that Promote Becoming a Mother Questionnaires were used in the study, as well as qualitative analysis.

RESULTS

Sixty-one postpartum nurses participated in the study. Increased stigma was associated with an increase in negative attitudes towards parenthood among people with severe mental illness, in general, and towards their parenthood skills, in particular. Postpartum nurses reported a decrease in nursing interventions and a therapeutic nurse-client relationship that fosters mother's empowerment. Themes that emerged from the qualitative analysis were postpartum nurse's perceptions of inadequacy, difficulty of postpartum nurses taking responsibility for managing women with severe mental illness and a paternalistic approach to these women, rather than empowerment, regarding infant care.

CONCLUSION

Nurses providing care to postpartum women with severe mental illness and their infants may provide fewer routine postpartum interventions due to professional stigma and negative attitudes concerning parenting skills. Nurses should provide individualised, tailored care that allows women with severe mental illness to become a mother to the best of her ability.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Not all women with severe mental illness are capable of caring for themselves and/or their baby. Nurses should provide individualised, tailored care that allows the women with severe mental illness to become a mother to the best of her ability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Henrietta Szold/Hadassah-Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Mental Health Division, Meuhedet Health Fund, Tel Aviv, Israel.Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social Welfare, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel.School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Henrietta Szold/Hadassah-Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai, Jerusalem, Israel. Elmhurst Hospital, Elmhurst, NY, USA.School of Nursing, Faculty of Medicine, Henrietta Szold/Hadassah-Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29148602

Citation

Ordan, Revital, et al. "Nurses' Professional Stigma and Attitudes Towards Postpartum Women With Severe Mental Illness." Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 27, no. 7-8, 2018, pp. 1543-1551.
Ordan R, Shor R, Liebergall-Wischnitzer M, et al. Nurses' professional stigma and attitudes towards postpartum women with severe mental illness. J Clin Nurs. 2018;27(7-8):1543-1551.
Ordan, R., Shor, R., Liebergall-Wischnitzer, M., Noble, L., & Noble, A. (2018). Nurses' professional stigma and attitudes towards postpartum women with severe mental illness. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(7-8), pp. 1543-1551. doi:10.1111/jocn.14179.
Ordan R, et al. Nurses' Professional Stigma and Attitudes Towards Postpartum Women With Severe Mental Illness. J Clin Nurs. 2018;27(7-8):1543-1551. PubMed PMID: 29148602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nurses' professional stigma and attitudes towards postpartum women with severe mental illness. AU - Ordan,Revital, AU - Shor,Ron, AU - Liebergall-Wischnitzer,Michal, AU - Noble,Lawrence, AU - Noble,Anita, Y1 - 2018/01/11/ PY - 2017/11/04/accepted PY - 2017/11/18/pubmed PY - 2018/8/28/medline PY - 2017/11/18/entrez KW - mental health KW - postpartum care KW - severe mental illness (SMI) KW - women's health SP - 1543 EP - 1551 JF - Journal of clinical nursing JO - J Clin Nurs VL - 27 IS - 7-8 N2 - AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To examine professional stigma and attitudes of parenthood towards postpartum women with severe mental illness and the association between postpartum nurses' attitudes and nursing interventions that promote motherhood. BACKGROUND: Stigma and attitudes towards parenthood of women with severe mental illness may influence nurses' clinical practices. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, mixed methods. METHODS: The Stigma among Health Professionals towards People with Severe Mental Illness, Attitudes towards Parenthood among People with Severe Mental Illness and Nursing Interventions that Promote Becoming a Mother Questionnaires were used in the study, as well as qualitative analysis. RESULTS: Sixty-one postpartum nurses participated in the study. Increased stigma was associated with an increase in negative attitudes towards parenthood among people with severe mental illness, in general, and towards their parenthood skills, in particular. Postpartum nurses reported a decrease in nursing interventions and a therapeutic nurse-client relationship that fosters mother's empowerment. Themes that emerged from the qualitative analysis were postpartum nurse's perceptions of inadequacy, difficulty of postpartum nurses taking responsibility for managing women with severe mental illness and a paternalistic approach to these women, rather than empowerment, regarding infant care. CONCLUSION: Nurses providing care to postpartum women with severe mental illness and their infants may provide fewer routine postpartum interventions due to professional stigma and negative attitudes concerning parenting skills. Nurses should provide individualised, tailored care that allows women with severe mental illness to become a mother to the best of her ability. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Not all women with severe mental illness are capable of caring for themselves and/or their baby. Nurses should provide individualised, tailored care that allows the women with severe mental illness to become a mother to the best of her ability. SN - 1365-2702 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29148602/Nurses'_professional_stigma_and_attitudes_towards_postpartum_women_with_severe_mental_illness_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jocn.14179 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -