Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Recent knowledge on hepatitis E virus in Suidae reservoirs and transmission routes to human.
Vet Res. 2017 11 21; 48(1):78.VR

Abstract

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes self-limiting acute hepatitis in humans that can eventually result in acute liver failures or progress to chronic infections. While in tropical and sub-tropical areas, HEV infections are associated with important waterborne epidemics, in Northern countries, HEV infections are autochthonous with a zoonotic origin. In the past decade, it has become clear that certain HEV genotypes are zoonotic and that swine, and more generally Suidae, are the main reservoir. Zoonotic transmissions of the virus may occur via direct contact with infected pigs, wild boars or consumption of contaminated meat. This review describes the current knowledge on domestic and wild Suidae as reservoirs of HEV and the evidence of the different routes of HEV transmission between these animals and humans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Animal Health Laboratory, UMR 1161 Virology, ANSES, Maisons-Alfort, France. nicole.pavio@anses.fr. UMR 1161 Virology, INRA, Maisons-Alfort, France. nicole.pavio@anses.fr. UMR 1161 Virology, PRES University Paris 12, National Veterinary School, Maisons-Alfort, France. nicole.pavio@anses.fr.Animal Health Laboratory, UMR 1161 Virology, ANSES, Maisons-Alfort, France. UMR 1161 Virology, INRA, Maisons-Alfort, France. UMR 1161 Virology, PRES University Paris 12, National Veterinary School, Maisons-Alfort, France.Animal Health Laboratory, UMR 1161 Virology, ANSES, Maisons-Alfort, France. UMR 1161 Virology, INRA, Maisons-Alfort, France. UMR 1161 Virology, PRES University Paris 12, National Veterinary School, Maisons-Alfort, France.German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment, Berlin, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29157309

Citation

Pavio, Nicole, et al. "Recent Knowledge On Hepatitis E Virus in Suidae Reservoirs and Transmission Routes to Human." Veterinary Research, vol. 48, no. 1, 2017, p. 78.
Pavio N, Doceul V, Bagdassarian E, et al. Recent knowledge on hepatitis E virus in Suidae reservoirs and transmission routes to human. Vet Res. 2017;48(1):78.
Pavio, N., Doceul, V., Bagdassarian, E., & Johne, R. (2017). Recent knowledge on hepatitis E virus in Suidae reservoirs and transmission routes to human. Veterinary Research, 48(1), 78. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13567-017-0483-9
Pavio N, et al. Recent Knowledge On Hepatitis E Virus in Suidae Reservoirs and Transmission Routes to Human. Vet Res. 2017 11 21;48(1):78. PubMed PMID: 29157309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recent knowledge on hepatitis E virus in Suidae reservoirs and transmission routes to human. AU - Pavio,Nicole, AU - Doceul,Virginie, AU - Bagdassarian,Eugénie, AU - Johne,Reimar, Y1 - 2017/11/21/ PY - 2017/05/04/received PY - 2017/10/16/accepted PY - 2017/11/22/entrez PY - 2017/11/22/pubmed PY - 2018/6/26/medline SP - 78 EP - 78 JF - Veterinary research JO - Vet Res VL - 48 IS - 1 N2 - Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes self-limiting acute hepatitis in humans that can eventually result in acute liver failures or progress to chronic infections. While in tropical and sub-tropical areas, HEV infections are associated with important waterborne epidemics, in Northern countries, HEV infections are autochthonous with a zoonotic origin. In the past decade, it has become clear that certain HEV genotypes are zoonotic and that swine, and more generally Suidae, are the main reservoir. Zoonotic transmissions of the virus may occur via direct contact with infected pigs, wild boars or consumption of contaminated meat. This review describes the current knowledge on domestic and wild Suidae as reservoirs of HEV and the evidence of the different routes of HEV transmission between these animals and humans. SN - 1297-9716 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29157309/Recent_knowledge_on_hepatitis_E_virus_in_Suidae_reservoirs_and_transmission_routes_to_human_ L2 - https://veterinaryresearch.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13567-017-0483-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -