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Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality.
Gastroenterology 2018; 154(4):916-926.e9G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Few studies have examined the association between coffee intake and survival after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a prospective study to investigate the association between coffee intake after a diagnosis of CRC and mortality.

METHODS

We collected data from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2012), following 1599 patients diagnosed with stage 1, 2, or 3 CRC. CRC was reported on questionnaires and ascertained by review of medical records and pathology reports; intake of food and beverages was determined from responses to semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires. Participants were asked how often during the previous year that they consumed coffee, with 1 cup as the standard portion size. The first questionnaire response collected at least 6 months but not more than 4 years after diagnosis was used for assessment of post-diagnostic intake (median time from diagnosis to the dietary assessment, 2.2 years). The last semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire prior to diagnosis was used to assess pre-diagnostic dietary intake.

RESULTS

During a median of 7.8 years of follow-up, we documented 803 deaths, of which 188 were because of CRC. In the multivariable adjusted models, compared with nondrinkers, patients who consumed at least 4 cups of coffee per day had a 52% lower risk of CRC-specific death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% CI, 0.28-0.83; P for trend=.003) and 30% reduced risk of all-cause death (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.54-0.91; P for trend <.001). High intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee (2 or more cups/day) was associated with lower risk of CRC-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. When coffee intake before vs after CRC diagnosis were examined, compared with patients consistently consuming low amounts (less than 2 cups/day), those who maintained a high intake (2 or more cups/day) had a significantly lower risk of CRC-specific death (multivariable HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.44-0.89) and death from any cause (multivariable HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60-0.85).

CONCLUSIONS

In an analysis data from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we associated intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee after diagnosis of CRC with lower risk of CRC-specific death and overall death. Studies are needed to determine the mechanisms by which coffee might reduce CRC progression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Channing Division of Network Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit and Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Program in MPE Molecular Pathological Epidemiology, Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Oncologic Pathology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Channing Division of Network Medicine, Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Nutrition, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Unit and Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: msong2@mgh.harvard.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29158191

Citation

Hu, Yang, et al. "Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality." Gastroenterology, vol. 154, no. 4, 2018, pp. 916-926.e9.
Hu Y, Ding M, Yuan C, et al. Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality. Gastroenterology. 2018;154(4):916-926.e9.
Hu, Y., Ding, M., Yuan, C., Wu, K., Smith-Warner, S. A., Hu, F. B., ... Song, M. (2018). Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality. Gastroenterology, 154(4), pp. 916-926.e9. doi:10.1053/j.gastro.2017.11.010.
Hu Y, et al. Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality. Gastroenterology. 2018;154(4):916-926.e9. PubMed PMID: 29158191.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association Between Coffee Intake After Diagnosis of Colorectal Cancer and Reduced Mortality. AU - Hu,Yang, AU - Ding,Ming, AU - Yuan,Chen, AU - Wu,Kana, AU - Smith-Warner,Stephanie A, AU - Hu,Frank B, AU - Chan,Andrew T, AU - Meyerhardt,Jeffrey A, AU - Ogino,Shuji, AU - Fuchs,Charles S, AU - Giovannucci,Edward L, AU - Song,Mingyang, Y1 - 2017/11/20/ PY - 2017/08/02/received PY - 2017/11/04/revised PY - 2017/11/13/accepted PY - 2017/11/22/pubmed PY - 2018/4/25/medline PY - 2017/11/22/entrez KW - Colon Cancer KW - Diet KW - Post-diagnostic Coffee Intake KW - Rectal Cancer SP - 916 EP - 926.e9 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 154 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Few studies have examined the association between coffee intake and survival after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). We performed a prospective study to investigate the association between coffee intake after a diagnosis of CRC and mortality. METHODS: We collected data from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2012) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2012), following 1599 patients diagnosed with stage 1, 2, or 3 CRC. CRC was reported on questionnaires and ascertained by review of medical records and pathology reports; intake of food and beverages was determined from responses to semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires. Participants were asked how often during the previous year that they consumed coffee, with 1 cup as the standard portion size. The first questionnaire response collected at least 6 months but not more than 4 years after diagnosis was used for assessment of post-diagnostic intake (median time from diagnosis to the dietary assessment, 2.2 years). The last semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire prior to diagnosis was used to assess pre-diagnostic dietary intake. RESULTS: During a median of 7.8 years of follow-up, we documented 803 deaths, of which 188 were because of CRC. In the multivariable adjusted models, compared with nondrinkers, patients who consumed at least 4 cups of coffee per day had a 52% lower risk of CRC-specific death (hazard ratio [HR] 0.48; 95% CI, 0.28-0.83; P for trend=.003) and 30% reduced risk of all-cause death (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.54-0.91; P for trend <.001). High intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee (2 or more cups/day) was associated with lower risk of CRC-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. When coffee intake before vs after CRC diagnosis were examined, compared with patients consistently consuming low amounts (less than 2 cups/day), those who maintained a high intake (2 or more cups/day) had a significantly lower risk of CRC-specific death (multivariable HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.44-0.89) and death from any cause (multivariable HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60-0.85). CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis data from the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, we associated intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee after diagnosis of CRC with lower risk of CRC-specific death and overall death. Studies are needed to determine the mechanisms by which coffee might reduce CRC progression. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29158191/Association_Between_Coffee_Intake_After_Diagnosis_of_Colorectal_Cancer_and_Reduced_Mortality_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0016-5085(17)36368-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -