Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs.
Pediatrics. 2017 Dec; 140(6)Ped

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little information is available on the associations between nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) and dating violence victimization (DVV) among high school students and how associations vary by sex.

METHODS

We used data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of students in grades 9 to 12. The sample was restricted to students who dated during the 12 months before the survey, resulting in a sample of 5136 boys and 5307 girls. Sex-stratified logistic regression models estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between lifetime NMUPD and DVV. In our analyses, we examined a 4-level DVV measure: no DVV, physical only, sexual only, and both physical and sexual.

RESULTS

Male students had a significantly lower prevalence of DVV compared with female students. By using the 4-level measure of DVV, after adjusting for covariates, sexual DVV only (aPR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.21-2.12) and both physical and sexual DVV (aPR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.26-2.17) were positively associated with NUMPD among boys, whereas among girls, physical DVV only (aPR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.16-1.75) and both physical and sexual DVV (aPR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.03-1.99) were positively associated with NMUPD.

CONCLUSIONS

NMUPD was associated with experiences of DVV among both male and female students. Community- or school-based adolescent violence and substance use prevention efforts would be enhanced by considering the association between DVV and substance use, particularly NMUPD among both male and female adolescents, to address these public health problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention and hhc9@cdc.gov.Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention and.Divisions of Violence Prevention and.Division of Adolescent and School Health, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention and. US Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, Rockville, Maryland.Unintentional Injury Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; and.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29158227

Citation

Clayton, Heather B., et al. "Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs." Pediatrics, vol. 140, no. 6, 2017.
Clayton HB, Lowry R, Basile KC, et al. Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs. Pediatrics. 2017;140(6).
Clayton, H. B., Lowry, R., Basile, K. C., Demissie, Z., & Bohm, M. K. (2017). Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs. Pediatrics, 140(6). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2017-2289
Clayton HB, et al. Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs. Pediatrics. 2017;140(6) PubMed PMID: 29158227.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physical and Sexual Dating Violence and Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs. AU - Clayton,Heather B, AU - Lowry,Richard, AU - Basile,Kathleen C, AU - Demissie,Zewditu, AU - Bohm,Michele K, PY - 2017/09/22/accepted PY - 2017/11/22/pubmed PY - 2017/12/12/medline PY - 2017/11/22/entrez JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 140 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little information is available on the associations between nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) and dating violence victimization (DVV) among high school students and how associations vary by sex. METHODS: We used data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, a cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of students in grades 9 to 12. The sample was restricted to students who dated during the 12 months before the survey, resulting in a sample of 5136 boys and 5307 girls. Sex-stratified logistic regression models estimated adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between lifetime NMUPD and DVV. In our analyses, we examined a 4-level DVV measure: no DVV, physical only, sexual only, and both physical and sexual. RESULTS: Male students had a significantly lower prevalence of DVV compared with female students. By using the 4-level measure of DVV, after adjusting for covariates, sexual DVV only (aPR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.21-2.12) and both physical and sexual DVV (aPR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.26-2.17) were positively associated with NUMPD among boys, whereas among girls, physical DVV only (aPR = 1.42, 95% CI: 1.16-1.75) and both physical and sexual DVV (aPR = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.03-1.99) were positively associated with NMUPD. CONCLUSIONS: NMUPD was associated with experiences of DVV among both male and female students. Community- or school-based adolescent violence and substance use prevention efforts would be enhanced by considering the association between DVV and substance use, particularly NMUPD among both male and female adolescents, to address these public health problems. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29158227/Physical_and_Sexual_Dating_Violence_and_Nonmedical_Use_of_Prescription_Drugs_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=29158227 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -