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Virulence traits of avian pathogenic (APEC) and fecal (AFEC) E. coli isolated from broiler chickens in Algeria.
Trop Anim Health Prod. 2018 Mar; 50(3):547-553.TA

Abstract

Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is the etiologic agent of avian colibacillosis, the most common disease responsible for chicken morbidity in the world. Although multiple virulence-associated factors were identified, their prevalence in Algeria is still poorly known. In the present research, 92 avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) isolates were recovered from broilers with clinical signs and lesions of colibacillosis. In addition, 32 E. coli isolates collected from feces of healthy birds (AFEC) were included for comparison. All isolates were investigated by PCR for the presence of a total of 11 virulence-associated genes described for avian pathogenic (iroN, ompT, hlyF, iss, iutA, and fimC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (eae, stx, elt/est, ipaH, and aggR). The sensitivity of 39 APEC isolates to 16 antibiotics was also determined using antimicrobial pretreated microplates. Here, we report that 98% of the examined isolates host at least one of the tested virulence factors. The most prevalent genes in APEC were iutA (90.6%), ompT (86.9%), and iss (85.8%); whereas, iutA (78.1%), fimC (78.1%), and iroN (68.7%) were the highest prevalent genes in AFEC. Our data showed that none of the AFEC isolates harbor any of the tested diarrheagenic genes. Moreover, only elt/est (5.4%), stx (2.1%), and ipaH (2.1%) genes were carried by APEC isolates. We further established that ceftazodime, ceftiofur, mequindox, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and meropenem were the most efficient antibiotics against the analyzed APEC isolates. Overall, our findings provide more insights about APEC and AFEC virulence potential in Algeria which could participate in the fight against colibacillosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université Ziane Achour, BP 3117, Route de Moudjbara, 17000, Djelfa, Algeria. Laboratoire des Biotechnologies Liées à la Reproduction Animale, Institut des Sciences Vétérinaires, Université Saad Dahleb, Route de Soumaa, BP 270, 09000, Blida, Algeria.Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Animal Products, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Center, Qingdao, 266032, China.Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Animal Products, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Center, Qingdao, 266032, China.Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Animal Products, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Center, Qingdao, 266032, China.Laboratoire des Biotechnologies Liées à la Reproduction Animale, Institut des Sciences Vétérinaires, Université Saad Dahleb, Route de Soumaa, BP 270, 09000, Blida, Algeria.Faculté des Sciences, Université Yahia Fares, 26000, Médéa, Algeria.Laboratory of Quality and Safety Risk Assessment for Animal Products, China Animal Health and Epidemiology Center, Qingdao, 266032, China. yffs2000@sina.com.Faculté des Sciences, Université Yahia Fares, 26000, Médéa, Algeria. benacourkarine1@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29164427

Citation

Mohamed, Lounis, et al. "Virulence Traits of Avian Pathogenic (APEC) and Fecal (AFEC) E. Coli Isolated From Broiler Chickens in Algeria." Tropical Animal Health and Production, vol. 50, no. 3, 2018, pp. 547-553.
Mohamed L, Ge Z, Yuehua L, et al. Virulence traits of avian pathogenic (APEC) and fecal (AFEC) E. coli isolated from broiler chickens in Algeria. Trop Anim Health Prod. 2018;50(3):547-553.
Mohamed, L., Ge, Z., Yuehua, L., Yubin, G., Rachid, K., Mustapha, O., Junwei, W., & Karine, O. (2018). Virulence traits of avian pathogenic (APEC) and fecal (AFEC) E. coli isolated from broiler chickens in Algeria. Tropical Animal Health and Production, 50(3), 547-553. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11250-017-1467-5
Mohamed L, et al. Virulence Traits of Avian Pathogenic (APEC) and Fecal (AFEC) E. Coli Isolated From Broiler Chickens in Algeria. Trop Anim Health Prod. 2018;50(3):547-553. PubMed PMID: 29164427.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Virulence traits of avian pathogenic (APEC) and fecal (AFEC) E. coli isolated from broiler chickens in Algeria. AU - Mohamed,Lounis, AU - Ge,Zhao, AU - Yuehua,Li, AU - Yubin,Gao, AU - Rachid,Kaidi, AU - Mustapha,Oumouna, AU - Junwei,Wang, AU - Karine,Oumouna, Y1 - 2017/11/21/ PY - 2017/06/22/received PY - 2017/11/06/accepted PY - 2017/11/23/pubmed PY - 2018/8/7/medline PY - 2017/11/23/entrez KW - AFEC KW - APEC KW - Algeria KW - Antibiotics KW - Avian colibacillosis KW - E. coli KW - Virulence factors SP - 547 EP - 553 JF - Tropical animal health and production JO - Trop Anim Health Prod VL - 50 IS - 3 N2 - Avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) is the etiologic agent of avian colibacillosis, the most common disease responsible for chicken morbidity in the world. Although multiple virulence-associated factors were identified, their prevalence in Algeria is still poorly known. In the present research, 92 avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC) isolates were recovered from broilers with clinical signs and lesions of colibacillosis. In addition, 32 E. coli isolates collected from feces of healthy birds (AFEC) were included for comparison. All isolates were investigated by PCR for the presence of a total of 11 virulence-associated genes described for avian pathogenic (iroN, ompT, hlyF, iss, iutA, and fimC) and diarrheagenic E. coli (eae, stx, elt/est, ipaH, and aggR). The sensitivity of 39 APEC isolates to 16 antibiotics was also determined using antimicrobial pretreated microplates. Here, we report that 98% of the examined isolates host at least one of the tested virulence factors. The most prevalent genes in APEC were iutA (90.6%), ompT (86.9%), and iss (85.8%); whereas, iutA (78.1%), fimC (78.1%), and iroN (68.7%) were the highest prevalent genes in AFEC. Our data showed that none of the AFEC isolates harbor any of the tested diarrheagenic genes. Moreover, only elt/est (5.4%), stx (2.1%), and ipaH (2.1%) genes were carried by APEC isolates. We further established that ceftazodime, ceftiofur, mequindox, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and meropenem were the most efficient antibiotics against the analyzed APEC isolates. Overall, our findings provide more insights about APEC and AFEC virulence potential in Algeria which could participate in the fight against colibacillosis. SN - 1573-7438 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29164427/Virulence_traits_of_avian_pathogenic__APEC__and_fecal__AFEC__E__coli_isolated_from_broiler_chickens_in_Algeria_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11250-017-1467-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -