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Vitamin D deficiency is associated with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.
Maturitas. 2018 Jan; 107:97-102.M

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the association between vitamin D (VD) deficiency and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in postmenopausal women.

STUDY DESIGN

Observational, cross-sectional cohort study.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

In this study, 463 women, aged 45-75 years, with amenorrhea >12months, without VD supplementation or established cardiovascular disease were included. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected. Biochemical parameters, including total cholesterol (TC), HDL, LDL, triglycerides, glucose, insulin and 25-hydroxyvitamin-D [25(OH)D] were measured. Women meeting three or more of the following criteria were diagnosed with MetS: waist circumference >88cm, triglycerides ≥150mg/dL, HDL <50mg/dL, blood pressure ≥130/85mmHg and glucose ≥100mg/dL. Serum 25(OH)D levels were classified as sufficient (≥30ng/mL), insufficient (20-29ng/mL) or deficient (<20ng/mL). ANOVA, chi-square test and logistic regression (odds ratio, OR) were used for statistical analysis.

RESULTS

Serum 25(OH)D levels were sufficient in 148 women (32.0%), insufficient in 151 (32.6%) and deficient in 164 (35.4%). Women with low 25(OH)D levels had higher TC, triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR levels (p<0.05). MetS was detected in 57.8% (182/315) of women with hypovitaminosis D (insufficient and deficient) and in 39.8% (59/148) of those with sufficient VD​​ (p=0.003). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a low 25(OH)D level (<30ng/mL) was significantly associated with MetS (OR1.90, 95%CI=1.26-2.85), high triglyceride levels (OR1.55, 95%CI=1.13-2.35), and low HDL levels (OR1.60, 95%CI=1.19-2.40) (p<0.05) compared with women with sufficient 25(OH)D levels, after adjusting for age, time since menopause, body mass index, smoking and physical exercise. The mean concentration of 25(OH)D decreased with increasing numbers of MetS components (p=0.016).

CONCLUSIONS

VD deficiency in postmenopausal women was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS. Women with VD deficiency had a higher risk of MetS, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL than those with adequate levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil.Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Botucatu Medical School, Sao Paulo State University - UNESP, Sao Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: epetri@fmb.unesp.br.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29169589

Citation

Schmitt, Eneida Boteon, et al. "Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in Postmenopausal Women." Maturitas, vol. 107, 2018, pp. 97-102.
Schmitt EB, Nahas-Neto J, Bueloni-Dias F, et al. Vitamin D deficiency is associated with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Maturitas. 2018;107:97-102.
Schmitt, E. B., Nahas-Neto, J., Bueloni-Dias, F., Poloni, P. F., Orsatti, C. L., & Petri Nahas, E. A. (2018). Vitamin D deficiency is associated with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. Maturitas, 107, 97-102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.10.011
Schmitt EB, et al. Vitamin D Deficiency Is Associated With Metabolic Syndrome in Postmenopausal Women. Maturitas. 2018;107:97-102. PubMed PMID: 29169589.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D deficiency is associated with metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women. AU - Schmitt,Eneida Boteon, AU - Nahas-Neto,Jorge, AU - Bueloni-Dias,Flavia, AU - Poloni,Priscila Ferreira, AU - Orsatti,Claudio Lera, AU - Petri Nahas,Eliana Aguiar, Y1 - 2017/10/18/ PY - 2017/05/23/received PY - 2017/09/11/revised PY - 2017/10/13/accepted PY - 2017/11/25/entrez PY - 2017/11/25/pubmed PY - 2018/5/18/medline KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Postmenopausal women KW - Vitamin D SP - 97 EP - 102 JF - Maturitas JO - Maturitas VL - 107 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association between vitamin D (VD) deficiency and risk factors for metabolic syndrome (MetS) in postmenopausal women. STUDY DESIGN: Observational, cross-sectional cohort study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In this study, 463 women, aged 45-75 years, with amenorrhea >12months, without VD supplementation or established cardiovascular disease were included. Clinical and anthropometric data were collected. Biochemical parameters, including total cholesterol (TC), HDL, LDL, triglycerides, glucose, insulin and 25-hydroxyvitamin-D [25(OH)D] were measured. Women meeting three or more of the following criteria were diagnosed with MetS: waist circumference >88cm, triglycerides ≥150mg/dL, HDL <50mg/dL, blood pressure ≥130/85mmHg and glucose ≥100mg/dL. Serum 25(OH)D levels were classified as sufficient (≥30ng/mL), insufficient (20-29ng/mL) or deficient (<20ng/mL). ANOVA, chi-square test and logistic regression (odds ratio, OR) were used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Serum 25(OH)D levels were sufficient in 148 women (32.0%), insufficient in 151 (32.6%) and deficient in 164 (35.4%). Women with low 25(OH)D levels had higher TC, triglycerides, insulin and HOMA-IR levels (p<0.05). MetS was detected in 57.8% (182/315) of women with hypovitaminosis D (insufficient and deficient) and in 39.8% (59/148) of those with sufficient VD​​ (p=0.003). In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, a low 25(OH)D level (<30ng/mL) was significantly associated with MetS (OR1.90, 95%CI=1.26-2.85), high triglyceride levels (OR1.55, 95%CI=1.13-2.35), and low HDL levels (OR1.60, 95%CI=1.19-2.40) (p<0.05) compared with women with sufficient 25(OH)D levels, after adjusting for age, time since menopause, body mass index, smoking and physical exercise. The mean concentration of 25(OH)D decreased with increasing numbers of MetS components (p=0.016). CONCLUSIONS: VD deficiency in postmenopausal women was associated with a higher prevalence of MetS. Women with VD deficiency had a higher risk of MetS, hypertriglyceridemia and low HDL than those with adequate levels. SN - 1873-4111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29169589/Vitamin_D_deficiency_is_associated_with_metabolic_syndrome_in_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-5122(17)30628-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -