Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

EEG correlates of visual short-term memory in older age vary with adult lifespan cognitive development.
Neurobiol Aging. 2018 02; 62:210-220.NA

Abstract

Visual short-term memory (vSTM) is a cognitive resource that declines with age. This study investigated whether electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of vSTM vary with cognitive development over individuals' lifespan. We measured vSTM performance and EEG in a lateralized whole-report task in a healthy birth cohort, whose cognitive function (intelligence quotient) was assessed in youth and late-middle age. Higher vSTM capacity (K; measured by Bundesen's theory of visual attention) was associated with higher amplitudes of the contralateral delay activity (CDA) and the central positivity (CP). In addition, rightward hemifield asymmetry of vSTM (Kλ) was associated with lower CDA amplitudes. Furthermore, more severe cognitive decline from young adulthood to late-middle age predicted higher CDA amplitudes, and the relationship between K and the CDA was less reliable in individuals who show higher levels of cognitive decline compared to individuals with preserved abilities. By contrast, there was no significant effect of lifespan cognitive changes on the CP or the relationship between behavioral measures of vSTM and the CP. Neither the CDA, nor the CP, nor the relationships between K or Kλ and the event-related potentials were predicted by individuals' current cognitive status. Together, our findings indicate complex age-related changes in processes underlying behavioral and EEG measures of vSTM and suggest that the K-CDA relationship might be a marker of cognitive lifespan trajectories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Visual Cognition, Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research, Berlin, Germany; Center for Lifespan Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, Germany. Electronic address: wiegand@mpib-berlin.mpg.de.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: martin.johannes.lauritzen@regionh.dk.Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Research Center for Prevention and Health, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Center for Healthy Aging, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark; Department of Neuroscience and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Rigshospitalet - Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark.Center for Visual Cognition, Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.Center for Visual Cognition, Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29175710

Citation

Wiegand, Iris, et al. "EEG Correlates of Visual Short-term Memory in Older Age Vary With Adult Lifespan Cognitive Development." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 62, 2018, pp. 210-220.
Wiegand I, Lauritzen MJ, Osler M, et al. EEG correlates of visual short-term memory in older age vary with adult lifespan cognitive development. Neurobiol Aging. 2018;62:210-220.
Wiegand, I., Lauritzen, M. J., Osler, M., Mortensen, E. L., Rostrup, E., Rask, L., Richard, N., Horwitz, A., Benedek, K., Vangkilde, S., & Petersen, A. (2018). EEG correlates of visual short-term memory in older age vary with adult lifespan cognitive development. Neurobiology of Aging, 62, 210-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2017.10.018
Wiegand I, et al. EEG Correlates of Visual Short-term Memory in Older Age Vary With Adult Lifespan Cognitive Development. Neurobiol Aging. 2018;62:210-220. PubMed PMID: 29175710.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - EEG correlates of visual short-term memory in older age vary with adult lifespan cognitive development. AU - Wiegand,Iris, AU - Lauritzen,Martin J, AU - Osler,Merete, AU - Mortensen,Erik Lykke, AU - Rostrup,Egill, AU - Rask,Lene, AU - Richard,Nelly, AU - Horwitz,Anna, AU - Benedek,Krisztina, AU - Vangkilde,Signe, AU - Petersen,Anders, Y1 - 2017/10/31/ PY - 2017/01/16/received PY - 2017/10/16/revised PY - 2017/10/21/accepted PY - 2017/11/28/pubmed PY - 2018/9/27/medline PY - 2017/11/28/entrez KW - Contralateral delay activity KW - Electroencephalography KW - Healthy aging KW - Lifespan cognitive development KW - Visual short-term memory SP - 210 EP - 220 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol Aging VL - 62 N2 - Visual short-term memory (vSTM) is a cognitive resource that declines with age. This study investigated whether electroencephalography (EEG) correlates of vSTM vary with cognitive development over individuals' lifespan. We measured vSTM performance and EEG in a lateralized whole-report task in a healthy birth cohort, whose cognitive function (intelligence quotient) was assessed in youth and late-middle age. Higher vSTM capacity (K; measured by Bundesen's theory of visual attention) was associated with higher amplitudes of the contralateral delay activity (CDA) and the central positivity (CP). In addition, rightward hemifield asymmetry of vSTM (Kλ) was associated with lower CDA amplitudes. Furthermore, more severe cognitive decline from young adulthood to late-middle age predicted higher CDA amplitudes, and the relationship between K and the CDA was less reliable in individuals who show higher levels of cognitive decline compared to individuals with preserved abilities. By contrast, there was no significant effect of lifespan cognitive changes on the CP or the relationship between behavioral measures of vSTM and the CP. Neither the CDA, nor the CP, nor the relationships between K or Kλ and the event-related potentials were predicted by individuals' current cognitive status. Together, our findings indicate complex age-related changes in processes underlying behavioral and EEG measures of vSTM and suggest that the K-CDA relationship might be a marker of cognitive lifespan trajectories. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29175710/EEG_correlates_of_visual_short_term_memory_in_older_age_vary_with_adult_lifespan_cognitive_development_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(17)30357-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -