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The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study.
J Urban Health. 2018 02; 95(1):51-60.JU

Abstract

In this study of low-income Hispanic/Latino adults living in 291 individual apartments in the Bronx, New York, the apartment layout was significantly associated with the odds of depressive symptomology. Women living in apartments in which the most central rooms were the living, dining, or kitchen (i.e., rooms commonly used for communal activities) were less likely to have depressive symptomology (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.22-0.86) than women in apartments where the central rooms were lobbies or corridors, adjusting for demographics, health conditions, and housing and neighborhood characteristics. No statistically significant association was observed in men. We present the logic underlying the use of layout variables in this study and discuss the implications it may have for understanding the role of the home environment on psychological distress among inhabitants. The results of this study show how space syntax analysis can be used to better understanding disparities in the risk of depression and offer an additional opportunity for public health stakeholders to identify those most at risk for depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family & Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. earle.chambers@einstein.yu.edu.School of Architecture, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332, USA.School of Architecture, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, 29634, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29197035

Citation

Chambers, Earle C., et al. "The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology Among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study." Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, vol. 95, no. 1, 2018, pp. 51-60.
Chambers EC, Bafna S, Machry H. The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study. J Urban Health. 2018;95(1):51-60.
Chambers, E. C., Bafna, S., & Machry, H. (2018). The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study. Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 95(1), 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0216-4
Chambers EC, Bafna S, Machry H. The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology Among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study. J Urban Health. 2018;95(1):51-60. PubMed PMID: 29197035.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Association Between Apartment Layout and Depressive Symptomology among Hispanic/Latino Residents in Low-Income Housing: the AHOME Study. AU - Chambers,Earle C, AU - Bafna,Sonit, AU - Machry,Herminia, PY - 2017/12/3/pubmed PY - 2019/10/11/medline PY - 2017/12/3/entrez KW - Built environment KW - Depression KW - Hispanic/Latino KW - Housing KW - Space syntax SP - 51 EP - 60 JF - Journal of urban health : bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine JO - J Urban Health VL - 95 IS - 1 N2 - In this study of low-income Hispanic/Latino adults living in 291 individual apartments in the Bronx, New York, the apartment layout was significantly associated with the odds of depressive symptomology. Women living in apartments in which the most central rooms were the living, dining, or kitchen (i.e., rooms commonly used for communal activities) were less likely to have depressive symptomology (OR = 0.44, 95% CI = 0.22-0.86) than women in apartments where the central rooms were lobbies or corridors, adjusting for demographics, health conditions, and housing and neighborhood characteristics. No statistically significant association was observed in men. We present the logic underlying the use of layout variables in this study and discuss the implications it may have for understanding the role of the home environment on psychological distress among inhabitants. The results of this study show how space syntax analysis can be used to better understanding disparities in the risk of depression and offer an additional opportunity for public health stakeholders to identify those most at risk for depression. SN - 1468-2869 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29197035/The_Association_Between_Apartment_Layout_and_Depressive_Symptomology_among_Hispanic/Latino_Residents_in_Low_Income_Housing:_the_AHOME_Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-017-0216-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -