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The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department.
J Emerg Nurs 2018; 44(2):117-122.e1JE

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a genuine concern for sexually assaulted patients. Emergency departments are a place where sexually assaulted patients seek care, including treatment to prevent HIV. Prompt administration of nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis is essential because of the time-sensitive nature of the medications. Quality improvement measures at an urban hospital revealed delays in administration of postexposure prophylaxis to these patients.

METHODS

A forensic simulation course and checklist was developed for emergency departments to improve care for sexually assaulted patients. Data used for analysis included time of administration of nonoccupational postexposure medication and length of stay before and after intervention with the simulation course and checklist. Points of measurement included student t-test to assess any significant differences and regression analysis to determine associations.

RESULTS

When comparing differences between time of nonoccupational postexposure before and after intervention, there was a trend toward improving the time of administration, but it was not found to be significant. Before intervention, an association was found with sexually assaulted patients' lengths of stay and the time that nonoccupational postexposure medication was administered, with a regression equation of R2, 0.76. After intervention, this association was absent, with an R2 of 0.017.

DISCUSSION

Implementing a simulation course and checklist for emergency nurses in caring for sexually assaulted patients helps to improve the timeliness of administration of nonoccupational postexposure medications and resolve the association between the length of stay and time of administration of medication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Boston, MA. Electronic address: mjscannell@partners.org.Boston, MA.Boston, MA.Boston, MA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29198380

Citation

Scannell, Meredith, et al. "The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department." Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, vol. 44, no. 2, 2018, pp. 117-122.e1.
Scannell M, MacDonald AE, Berger A, et al. The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department. J Emerg Nurs. 2018;44(2):117-122.e1.
Scannell, M., MacDonald, A. E., Berger, A., & Boyer, N. (2018). The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department. Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, 44(2), pp. 117-122.e1. doi:10.1016/j.jen.2017.10.014.
Scannell M, et al. The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department. J Emerg Nurs. 2018;44(2):117-122.e1. PubMed PMID: 29198380.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Priority of Administering HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis in Cases of Sexual Assault in an Emergency Department. AU - Scannell,Meredith, AU - MacDonald,Andrea E, AU - Berger,Amanda, AU - Boyer,Nichole, Y1 - 2017/11/29/ PY - 2017/01/14/received PY - 2017/07/25/revised PY - 2017/10/24/accepted PY - 2017/12/5/pubmed PY - 2018/9/18/medline PY - 2017/12/5/entrez KW - Emergency nursing KW - Emergency service KW - Forensic nursing KW - Sexual assault KW - Simulation training SP - 117 EP - 122.e1 JF - Journal of emergency nursing: JEN : official publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association JO - J Emerg Nurs VL - 44 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a genuine concern for sexually assaulted patients. Emergency departments are a place where sexually assaulted patients seek care, including treatment to prevent HIV. Prompt administration of nonoccupational postexposure prophylaxis is essential because of the time-sensitive nature of the medications. Quality improvement measures at an urban hospital revealed delays in administration of postexposure prophylaxis to these patients. METHODS: A forensic simulation course and checklist was developed for emergency departments to improve care for sexually assaulted patients. Data used for analysis included time of administration of nonoccupational postexposure medication and length of stay before and after intervention with the simulation course and checklist. Points of measurement included student t-test to assess any significant differences and regression analysis to determine associations. RESULTS: When comparing differences between time of nonoccupational postexposure before and after intervention, there was a trend toward improving the time of administration, but it was not found to be significant. Before intervention, an association was found with sexually assaulted patients' lengths of stay and the time that nonoccupational postexposure medication was administered, with a regression equation of R2, 0.76. After intervention, this association was absent, with an R2 of 0.017. DISCUSSION: Implementing a simulation course and checklist for emergency nurses in caring for sexually assaulted patients helps to improve the timeliness of administration of nonoccupational postexposure medications and resolve the association between the length of stay and time of administration of medication. SN - 1527-2966 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29198380/The_Priority_of_Administering_HIV_Postexposure_Prophylaxis_in_Cases_of_Sexual_Assault_in_an_Emergency_Department_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0099-1767(16)30327-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -