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Sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults: findings from Project EAT.
Public Health Nutr. 2018 03; 21(4):689-701.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test the associations between sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults, a group vulnerable to suboptimal sleep.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional analysis of survey measures of sleep (i.e. time in bed, variability, timing and quality) and dietary patterns (i.e. breakfast skipping, eating at fast-food restaurants, consumption of sports and energy drinks, and sugar-free, sugar-sweetened and caffeinated beverages).

SETTING

Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota (USA).

SUBJECTS

A total of 1854 respondents (20-30 years, 55·6 % female) from the 2008-2009 survey conducted for the third wave of the population-based Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults) study.

RESULTS

After adjustment for demographic and behavioural covariates in linear regression models, those who went to bed after 00.30 hours consumed 0·3 more servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day, consumed 1·7 times more energy drinks, skipped breakfast 1·8 more times per week and consumed fast food 0·3 more times per week compared with those who went to bed before 22.30 hours. Reported sleep quality in the lowest (Q1) v. highest (Q3) tertile was associated with more intake of energy drinks (Q3 v. Q1, prevalence ratio, 95 % CI: 1·79, 1·24, 2·34), sports drinks (1·28, 1·00, 1·55) and breakfast skipping (adjusted mean, 95 % CI: Q1: 4·03, 3·81, 4·26; Q3: 3·43, 3·17, 3·69). Time in bed and sleep variability were associated with few eating behaviours.

CONCLUSIONS

Some, but not all, sleep indices were related to problematic eating behaviours. Sleep habits may be important to address in interventions and policies that target improvements in eating patterns and health outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Psychiatry,University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine,3471 Fifth Avenue,Suite 1216,Kaufmann Medical Building,Pittsburgh,PA 15213,USA.2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota School of Public Health;Minneapolis,MN,USA.2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota School of Public Health;Minneapolis,MN,USA.2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota School of Public Health;Minneapolis,MN,USA.2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota School of Public Health;Minneapolis,MN,USA.2Division of Epidemiology and Community Health,University of Minnesota School of Public Health;Minneapolis,MN,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29208064

Citation

Ogilvie, Rachel P., et al. "Sleep Indices and Eating Behaviours in Young Adults: Findings From Project EAT." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 4, 2018, pp. 689-701.
Ogilvie RP, Lutsey PL, Widome R, et al. Sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults: findings from Project EAT. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(4):689-701.
Ogilvie, R. P., Lutsey, P. L., Widome, R., Laska, M. N., Larson, N., & Neumark-Sztainer, D. (2018). Sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults: findings from Project EAT. Public Health Nutrition, 21(4), 689-701. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980017003536
Ogilvie RP, et al. Sleep Indices and Eating Behaviours in Young Adults: Findings From Project EAT. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(4):689-701. PubMed PMID: 29208064.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults: findings from Project EAT. AU - Ogilvie,Rachel P, AU - Lutsey,Pamela L, AU - Widome,Rachel, AU - Laska,Melissa N, AU - Larson,Nicole, AU - Neumark-Sztainer,Dianne, Y1 - 2017/12/06/ PY - 2017/12/7/pubmed PY - 2019/2/20/medline PY - 2017/12/7/entrez KW - Breakfast KW - Caffeine KW - Energy drinks KW - Sleep duration KW - Sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 689 EP - 701 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 21 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test the associations between sleep indices and eating behaviours in young adults, a group vulnerable to suboptimal sleep. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analysis of survey measures of sleep (i.e. time in bed, variability, timing and quality) and dietary patterns (i.e. breakfast skipping, eating at fast-food restaurants, consumption of sports and energy drinks, and sugar-free, sugar-sweetened and caffeinated beverages). SETTING: Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area of Minnesota (USA). SUBJECTS: A total of 1854 respondents (20-30 years, 55·6 % female) from the 2008-2009 survey conducted for the third wave of the population-based Project EAT (Eating and Activity in Teens and Young Adults) study. RESULTS: After adjustment for demographic and behavioural covariates in linear regression models, those who went to bed after 00.30 hours consumed 0·3 more servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day, consumed 1·7 times more energy drinks, skipped breakfast 1·8 more times per week and consumed fast food 0·3 more times per week compared with those who went to bed before 22.30 hours. Reported sleep quality in the lowest (Q1) v. highest (Q3) tertile was associated with more intake of energy drinks (Q3 v. Q1, prevalence ratio, 95 % CI: 1·79, 1·24, 2·34), sports drinks (1·28, 1·00, 1·55) and breakfast skipping (adjusted mean, 95 % CI: Q1: 4·03, 3·81, 4·26; Q3: 3·43, 3·17, 3·69). Time in bed and sleep variability were associated with few eating behaviours. CONCLUSIONS: Some, but not all, sleep indices were related to problematic eating behaviours. Sleep habits may be important to address in interventions and policies that target improvements in eating patterns and health outcomes. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29208064/Sleep_indices_and_eating_behaviours_in_young_adults:_findings_from_Project_EAT_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980017003536/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -