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Keeping it together: Semantic coherence stabilizes phonological sequences in short-term memory.
Mem Cognit 2018; 46(3):426-437MC

Abstract

Our ability to hold a sequence of speech sounds in mind, in the correct configuration, supports many aspects of communication, but the contribution of conceptual information to this basic phonological capacity remains controversial. Previous research has shown modest and inconsistent benefits of meaning on phonological stability in short-term memory, but these studies were based on sets of unrelated words. Using a novel design, we examined the immediate recall of sentence-like sequences with coherent meaning, alongside both standard word lists and mixed lists containing words and nonwords. We found, and replicated, substantial effects of coherent meaning on phoneme-level accuracy: The phonemes of both words and nonwords within conceptually coherent sequences were more likely to be produced together and in the correct order. Since nonwords do not exist as items in long-term memory, the semantic enhancement of phoneme-level recall for both item types cannot be explained by a lexically based item reconstruction process employed at the point of retrieval ("redintegration"). Instead, our data show, for naturalistic input, that when meaning emerges from the combination of words, the phonological traces that support language are reinforced by a semantic-binding process that has been largely overlooked by past short-term memory research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychological & Social Sciences, York St John University, Lord Mayor's Walk, York, YO31 7EX, UK. n.savill@yorksj.ac.uk. Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK. n.savill@yorksj.ac.uk.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.Department of Psychology, University of York, York, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29214551

Citation

Savill, Nicola, et al. "Keeping It Together: Semantic Coherence Stabilizes Phonological Sequences in Short-term Memory." Memory & Cognition, vol. 46, no. 3, 2018, pp. 426-437.
Savill N, Ellis R, Brooke E, et al. Keeping it together: Semantic coherence stabilizes phonological sequences in short-term memory. Mem Cognit. 2018;46(3):426-437.
Savill, N., Ellis, R., Brooke, E., Koa, T., Ferguson, S., Rojas-Rodriguez, E., ... Jefferies, E. (2018). Keeping it together: Semantic coherence stabilizes phonological sequences in short-term memory. Memory & Cognition, 46(3), pp. 426-437. doi:10.3758/s13421-017-0775-3.
Savill N, et al. Keeping It Together: Semantic Coherence Stabilizes Phonological Sequences in Short-term Memory. Mem Cognit. 2018;46(3):426-437. PubMed PMID: 29214551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Keeping it together: Semantic coherence stabilizes phonological sequences in short-term memory. AU - Savill,Nicola, AU - Ellis,Rachel, AU - Brooke,Emma, AU - Koa,Tiffany, AU - Ferguson,Suzie, AU - Rojas-Rodriguez,Elena, AU - Arnold,Dominic, AU - Smallwood,Jonathan, AU - Jefferies,Elizabeth, PY - 2017/12/8/pubmed PY - 2019/1/10/medline PY - 2017/12/8/entrez KW - Meaning KW - Phonological binding KW - Semantic coherence KW - Speech KW - Verbal short-term memory SP - 426 EP - 437 JF - Memory & cognition JO - Mem Cognit VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - Our ability to hold a sequence of speech sounds in mind, in the correct configuration, supports many aspects of communication, but the contribution of conceptual information to this basic phonological capacity remains controversial. Previous research has shown modest and inconsistent benefits of meaning on phonological stability in short-term memory, but these studies were based on sets of unrelated words. Using a novel design, we examined the immediate recall of sentence-like sequences with coherent meaning, alongside both standard word lists and mixed lists containing words and nonwords. We found, and replicated, substantial effects of coherent meaning on phoneme-level accuracy: The phonemes of both words and nonwords within conceptually coherent sequences were more likely to be produced together and in the correct order. Since nonwords do not exist as items in long-term memory, the semantic enhancement of phoneme-level recall for both item types cannot be explained by a lexically based item reconstruction process employed at the point of retrieval ("redintegration"). Instead, our data show, for naturalistic input, that when meaning emerges from the combination of words, the phonological traces that support language are reinforced by a semantic-binding process that has been largely overlooked by past short-term memory research. SN - 1532-5946 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29214551/Keeping_it_together:_Semantic_coherence_stabilizes_phonological_sequences_in_short-term_memory L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13421-017-0775-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -