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Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma.
Ann Am Thorac Soc 2018; 15(2):217-224AA

Abstract

RATIONALE

Cross-sectional studies have linked intake of high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverages with asthma in schoolchildren.

OBJECTIVES

To examine associations of maternal prenatal and early childhood intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and fructose with current asthma in midchildhood (median age, 7.7 yr).

METHODS

We assessed maternal pregnancy (first- and second-trimester average) and child (median age, 3.3 yr) intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and total fructose using food frequency questionnaires in 1,068 mother-child pairs from Project Viva, a prospective prebirth cohort. In a multivariable analysis, we examined associations of quartiles of maternal and child sugar-sweetened beverage, juice, and total fructose intake with child current asthma in midchildhood, assessed by questionnaire as ever having doctor-diagnosed asthma plus taking asthma medications or reporting wheezing in the past 12 months.

RESULTS

Higher maternal pregnancy sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (mean, 0.6 servings/d; range, 0-5) was associated with younger maternal age, nonwhite race/ethnicity, lower education and income, and higher prepregnancy body mass index. Adjusting for prepregnancy body mass index and other covariates, comparing quartile 4 with quartile 1, higher maternal pregnancy intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.67) and total fructose (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-2.53) were associated with greater odds of midchildhood current asthma (prevalence, 19%). Higher early childhood fructose intake (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1) was also associated with midchildhood current asthma in models adjusted for maternal sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.97) and after additional adjustment for midchildhood body mass index z-score (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.95).

CONCLUSIONS

Higher sugar-sweetened beverage and fructose intake during pregnancy and in early childhood was associated with childhood asthma development independent of adiposity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1 Division of Rheumatology, Immunology, and Allergy. 2 Division of Immunology, Boston Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; and.3 Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.3 Division of Chronic Disease Research Across the Lifecourse, Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts.4 Channing Division of Network Medicine, and. 5 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.4 Channing Division of Network Medicine, and. 5 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29219619

Citation

Wright, Lakiea S., et al. "Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma." Annals of the American Thoracic Society, vol. 15, no. 2, 2018, pp. 217-224.
Wright LS, Rifas-Shiman SL, Oken E, et al. Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2018;15(2):217-224.
Wright, L. S., Rifas-Shiman, S. L., Oken, E., Litonjua, A. A., & Gold, D. R. (2018). Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 15(2), pp. 217-224. doi:10.1513/AnnalsATS.201707-530OC.
Wright LS, et al. Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma. Ann Am Thorac Soc. 2018;15(2):217-224. PubMed PMID: 29219619.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal and Early Life Fructose, Fructose-Containing Beverages, and Midchildhood Asthma. AU - Wright,Lakiea S, AU - Rifas-Shiman,Sheryl L, AU - Oken,Emily, AU - Litonjua,Augusto A, AU - Gold,Diane R, PY - 2017/12/9/pubmed PY - 2019/4/6/medline PY - 2017/12/9/entrez KW - asthma KW - childhood KW - fructose KW - pregnancy KW - sugar-sweetened beverages SP - 217 EP - 224 JF - Annals of the American Thoracic Society JO - Ann Am Thorac Soc VL - 15 IS - 2 N2 - RATIONALE: Cross-sectional studies have linked intake of high-fructose corn syrup-sweetened beverages with asthma in schoolchildren. OBJECTIVES: To examine associations of maternal prenatal and early childhood intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and fructose with current asthma in midchildhood (median age, 7.7 yr). METHODS: We assessed maternal pregnancy (first- and second-trimester average) and child (median age, 3.3 yr) intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and total fructose using food frequency questionnaires in 1,068 mother-child pairs from Project Viva, a prospective prebirth cohort. In a multivariable analysis, we examined associations of quartiles of maternal and child sugar-sweetened beverage, juice, and total fructose intake with child current asthma in midchildhood, assessed by questionnaire as ever having doctor-diagnosed asthma plus taking asthma medications or reporting wheezing in the past 12 months. RESULTS: Higher maternal pregnancy sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (mean, 0.6 servings/d; range, 0-5) was associated with younger maternal age, nonwhite race/ethnicity, lower education and income, and higher prepregnancy body mass index. Adjusting for prepregnancy body mass index and other covariates, comparing quartile 4 with quartile 1, higher maternal pregnancy intake of sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-2.67) and total fructose (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 0.98-2.53) were associated with greater odds of midchildhood current asthma (prevalence, 19%). Higher early childhood fructose intake (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1) was also associated with midchildhood current asthma in models adjusted for maternal sugar-sweetened beverages (odds ratio, 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-2.97) and after additional adjustment for midchildhood body mass index z-score (odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.95). CONCLUSIONS: Higher sugar-sweetened beverage and fructose intake during pregnancy and in early childhood was associated with childhood asthma development independent of adiposity. SN - 2325-6621 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29219619/Prenatal_and_Early_Life_Fructose_Fructose_Containing_Beverages_and_Midchildhood_Asthma_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1513/AnnalsATS.201707-530OC?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -