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Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment.
J Stud Alcohol Drugs 2018; 79(1):119-125JS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We measured changes in the average level of intoxication over time in the nighttime economy and identified the factors associated with intoxication, including pre-drinking.

METHOD

A random intercept sample of 320 pedestrians (105 women; 215 men) was interviewed and received breath alcohol analysis in the nighttime economy of Hamilton, New Zealand. Data were collected over a five-night period, between 7 P.M. and 2:30 A.M. Data were analyzed by plotting the moving average breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) over time and using linear regression models to identify the factors associated with BrAC.

RESULTS

Mean BrAC was 241.5 mcg/L for the full sample; 179.7 for women and 271.7 for men, which is a statistically significant difference. Mean BrAC was also significantly higher among those who engaged in pre-drinking than those who did not. In the regression models, time of night and pre-drinking were significantly associated with higher BrAC. The effect of pre-drinking on BrAC was larger for women than for men.

CONCLUSIONS

The average level of intoxication increases throughout the night. However, this masks a potentially important gender difference, in that women's intoxication levels stop increasing after midnight, whereas men's increase continuously through the night. Similarly, intoxication of pre-drinkers stops increasing from 11 P.M., although remaining higher than non-pre-drinkers throughout the night. Analysis of BrAC provides a more nuanced understanding of intoxication levels in the nighttime economy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Economics, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. National Institute of Demographic and Economic Analysis, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.School of Economics and Finance, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University Geelong, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University Geelong, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29227240

Citation

Cameron, Michael P., et al. "Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment." Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, vol. 79, no. 1, 2018, pp. 119-125.
Cameron MP, Roskruge MJ, Droste N, et al. Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2018;79(1):119-125.
Cameron, M. P., Roskruge, M. J., Droste, N., & Miller, P. G. (2018). Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment. Journal of Studies On Alcohol and Drugs, 79(1), pp. 119-125.
Cameron MP, et al. Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment. J Stud Alcohol Drugs. 2018;79(1):119-125. PubMed PMID: 29227240.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pre-Drinking and the Temporal Gradient of Intoxication in a New Zealand Nightlife Environment. AU - Cameron,Michael P, AU - Roskruge,Matthew J, AU - Droste,Nic, AU - Miller,Peter G, PY - 2017/12/12/entrez PY - 2017/12/12/pubmed PY - 2018/5/29/medline SP - 119 EP - 125 JF - Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs JO - J Stud Alcohol Drugs VL - 79 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We measured changes in the average level of intoxication over time in the nighttime economy and identified the factors associated with intoxication, including pre-drinking. METHOD: A random intercept sample of 320 pedestrians (105 women; 215 men) was interviewed and received breath alcohol analysis in the nighttime economy of Hamilton, New Zealand. Data were collected over a five-night period, between 7 P.M. and 2:30 A.M. Data were analyzed by plotting the moving average breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) over time and using linear regression models to identify the factors associated with BrAC. RESULTS: Mean BrAC was 241.5 mcg/L for the full sample; 179.7 for women and 271.7 for men, which is a statistically significant difference. Mean BrAC was also significantly higher among those who engaged in pre-drinking than those who did not. In the regression models, time of night and pre-drinking were significantly associated with higher BrAC. The effect of pre-drinking on BrAC was larger for women than for men. CONCLUSIONS: The average level of intoxication increases throughout the night. However, this masks a potentially important gender difference, in that women's intoxication levels stop increasing after midnight, whereas men's increase continuously through the night. Similarly, intoxication of pre-drinkers stops increasing from 11 P.M., although remaining higher than non-pre-drinkers throughout the night. Analysis of BrAC provides a more nuanced understanding of intoxication levels in the nighttime economy. SN - 1938-4114 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29227240/Pre_Drinking_and_the_Temporal_Gradient_of_Intoxication_in_a_New_Zealand_Nightlife_Environment_ L2 - https://www.jsad.com/doi/abs/10.15288/jsad.2018.79.119 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -