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Clinical factors are associated with vitamin D levels in IBD patients: A retrospective analysis.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

There is growing evidence that vitamin D deficiency plays a role in the development and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and clinical parameters in IBD is still not completely understood.

METHODS

A retrospective study of IBD patients was performed. Vitamin D values were analyzed, regardless of vitamin D substitution administration, and correlated with clinical parameters such as medical therapy, anatomical situation, location of the disease and disease activity. Level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <50 nmoL/L was regarded as vitamin D deficiency and <75 nmoL/L as insufficiency.

RESULTS

In total, 208 IBD patients were analyzed, including 123 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 85 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Therapy with azathioprine did not affect the vitamin D values of either disease entity. But CD patients benefited from therapy with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor and exhibited significantly higher vitamin D levels than those without. Furthermore, significantly lower vitamin D levels were found if CD was located in the small bowel or if the small bowel had been resected. Moreover, significantly lower levels of vitamin D were detectable for high disease activity (reflected by high simple clinical colitis activity index values) in patients with UC.

CONCLUSIONS

Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD. However, certain clinical situations lead to significantly lower vitamin D levels and may therefore require close monitoring for vitamin D deficiency.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    ,

    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    ,

    Institute for Biostatistics and Informatics in Medicine, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine II, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

    Source

    Journal of digestive diseases 19:1 2018 Jan pg 24-32

    MeSH

    Azathioprine
    Cholecalciferol
    Colitis, Ulcerative
    Crohn Disease
    Gastrointestinal Agents
    Germany
    Humans
    Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
    Postoperative Period
    Retrospective Studies
    Seasons
    Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29232067

    Citation

    Schäffler, Holger, et al. "Clinical Factors Are Associated With Vitamin D Levels in IBD Patients: a Retrospective Analysis." Journal of Digestive Diseases, vol. 19, no. 1, 2018, pp. 24-32.
    Schäffler H, Schmidt M, Huth A, et al. Clinical factors are associated with vitamin D levels in IBD patients: A retrospective analysis. J Dig Dis. 2018;19(1):24-32.
    Schäffler, H., Schmidt, M., Huth, A., Reiner, J., Glass, Ä., & Lamprecht, G. (2018). Clinical factors are associated with vitamin D levels in IBD patients: A retrospective analysis. Journal of Digestive Diseases, 19(1), pp. 24-32. doi:10.1111/1751-2980.12565.
    Schäffler H, et al. Clinical Factors Are Associated With Vitamin D Levels in IBD Patients: a Retrospective Analysis. J Dig Dis. 2018;19(1):24-32. PubMed PMID: 29232067.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical factors are associated with vitamin D levels in IBD patients: A retrospective analysis. AU - Schäffler,Holger, AU - Schmidt,Martin, AU - Huth,Astrid, AU - Reiner,Johannes, AU - Glass,Änne, AU - Lamprecht,Georg, PY - 2017/07/21/received PY - 2017/12/06/revised PY - 2017/12/08/accepted PY - 2017/12/13/pubmed PY - 2018/8/28/medline PY - 2017/12/13/entrez KW - Crohn disease KW - inflammatory bowel diseases KW - tumor necrosis factor-alpha KW - ulcerative colitis KW - vitamin D SP - 24 EP - 32 JF - Journal of digestive diseases JO - J Dig Dis VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: There is growing evidence that vitamin D deficiency plays a role in the development and the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the correlation between vitamin D deficiency and clinical parameters in IBD is still not completely understood. METHODS: A retrospective study of IBD patients was performed. Vitamin D values were analyzed, regardless of vitamin D substitution administration, and correlated with clinical parameters such as medical therapy, anatomical situation, location of the disease and disease activity. Level of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] <50 nmoL/L was regarded as vitamin D deficiency and <75 nmoL/L as insufficiency. RESULTS: In total, 208 IBD patients were analyzed, including 123 with Crohn's disease (CD) and 85 with ulcerative colitis (UC). Therapy with azathioprine did not affect the vitamin D values of either disease entity. But CD patients benefited from therapy with tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor and exhibited significantly higher vitamin D levels than those without. Furthermore, significantly lower vitamin D levels were found if CD was located in the small bowel or if the small bowel had been resected. Moreover, significantly lower levels of vitamin D were detectable for high disease activity (reflected by high simple clinical colitis activity index values) in patients with UC. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is common in patients with IBD. However, certain clinical situations lead to significantly lower vitamin D levels and may therefore require close monitoring for vitamin D deficiency. SN - 1751-2980 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29232067/Clinical_factors_are_associated_with_vitamin_D_levels_in_IBD_patients:_A_retrospective_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1751-2980.12565 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -