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Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, by Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia.
Prev Chronic Dis 2017; 14:E132PC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Information on dietary intake, including sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), for adults with disabilities is limited. Such information can inform interventions to prevent chronic disease and promote health among adults with disabilities. The objective of this study was to describe the associations between SSB consumption and disability among adults.

METHODS

We examined data on adults aged 18 years or older in 23 states and the District of Columbia who participated in the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 150,760). Participants who reported a limitation in any activity caused by physical, mental, or emotional problems or who reported use of special equipment were considered to have a disability (n = 41,199). Participants were classified as daily SSB consumers (≥1 time/d) and non-daily SSB consumers (<1 time/d). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between daily SSB intake and disability after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. An interaction effect between disability and obesity status was tested to consider obesity status as a potential effect modifier.

RESULTS

The prevalence of drinking SSBs at least once daily was significantly higher among adults with disabilities (30.3%) than among adults without disabilities (28.6%) (P = .01). After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, among nonobese adults, the odds of daily SSB intake were significantly higher among adults with disabilities than among adults without disabilities (adjusted odds ratio = 1.27, P < .001). Among obese adults, daily SSB intake was not associated with disability status (adjusted odds ratio = 0.97; P = .58).

CONCLUSION

Our findings highlight the need for increased awareness of SSB consumption among adults with disabilities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Northrop Grumman, 2800 Century Pkwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30345. Email: wox0@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. Commissioned Corps Officer, US Public Health Service, Atlanta, Georgia.Population Health Surveillance Branch, Division of Population Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29240555

Citation

Kim, Sunkyung, et al. "Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, By Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia." Preventing Chronic Disease, vol. 14, 2017, pp. E132.
Kim S, Park S, Carroll DD, et al. Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, by Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia. Prev Chronic Dis. 2017;14:E132.
Kim, S., Park, S., Carroll, D. D., & Okoro, C. A. (2017). Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, by Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia. Preventing Chronic Disease, 14, pp. E132. doi:10.5888/pcd14.160606.
Kim S, et al. Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, By Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia. Prev Chronic Dis. 2017 12 14;14:E132. PubMed PMID: 29240555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption, by Disability Status, Among Adults in 23 States and the District of Columbia. AU - Kim,Sunkyung, AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Carroll,Dianna D, AU - Okoro,Catherine A, Y1 - 2017/12/14/ PY - 2017/12/15/entrez PY - 2017/12/15/pubmed PY - 2018/8/14/medline SP - E132 EP - E132 JF - Preventing chronic disease JO - Prev Chronic Dis VL - 14 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Information on dietary intake, including sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs), for adults with disabilities is limited. Such information can inform interventions to prevent chronic disease and promote health among adults with disabilities. The objective of this study was to describe the associations between SSB consumption and disability among adults. METHODS: We examined data on adults aged 18 years or older in 23 states and the District of Columbia who participated in the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (n = 150,760). Participants who reported a limitation in any activity caused by physical, mental, or emotional problems or who reported use of special equipment were considered to have a disability (n = 41,199). Participants were classified as daily SSB consumers (≥1 time/d) and non-daily SSB consumers (<1 time/d). Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between daily SSB intake and disability after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. An interaction effect between disability and obesity status was tested to consider obesity status as a potential effect modifier. RESULTS: The prevalence of drinking SSBs at least once daily was significantly higher among adults with disabilities (30.3%) than among adults without disabilities (28.6%) (P = .01). After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, among nonobese adults, the odds of daily SSB intake were significantly higher among adults with disabilities than among adults without disabilities (adjusted odds ratio = 1.27, P < .001). Among obese adults, daily SSB intake was not associated with disability status (adjusted odds ratio = 0.97; P = .58). CONCLUSION: Our findings highlight the need for increased awareness of SSB consumption among adults with disabilities. SN - 1545-1151 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29240555/Daily_Sugar_Sweetened_Beverage_Consumption_by_Disability_Status_Among_Adults_in_23_States_and_the_District_of_Columbia_ L2 - https://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2017/16_0606.htm DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -