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Prevalence and correlates of benzodiazepine use and misuse among young adults who use prescription opioids non-medically.
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018 02 01; 183:73-77.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Benzodiazepine use dramatically increases the risk of unintentional overdose among people who use opioids non-medically. However, little is known about the patterns of co-occurring benzodiazepine and opioid use among young adults in the United States.

METHODS

The Rhode Island Young Adult Prescription Drug Study (RAPiDS) was a cross-sectional study from January 2015-February 2016. RAPiDS recruited 200 young adults aged 18-29 who reported past 30-day non-medical prescription opioid (NMPO) use. Using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher's exact test, we examined correlates associated with regular prescribed and non-medical use (defined as at least monthly) of benzodiazepines among NMPO users in Rhode Island.

RESULTS

Among participants, 171 (85.5%) reported lifetime benzodiazepine use and 125 (62.5%) reported regular benzodiazepine use. Nearly all (n=121, 96.8%) reported non-medical use and 43 (34.4%) reported prescribed use. Compared to the 75 participants who did not regularly use benzodiazepines, participants who reported regular use were more likely to be white (66.3% vs. 58.0%, p=0.03), have ever been incarcerated (52.8% vs. 37.3%, p=0.04), and have ever been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder (bipolar: 29.6% vs. 16.0%, p=0.04; anxiety: 56.8 vs. 36.0%, p=0.01). Although the association was marginally significant, accidental overdose was higher among those who were prescribed the benzodiazepine they used most frequently compared to those who were not (41.9% vs. 24.4%, p=0.06).

CONCLUSION

Benzodiazepine use and misuse are highly prevalent among young adult NMPO users. Harm reduction and prevention programs for this population are urgently needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Box G-S-121-2, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Box G-S-121-2, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Box G-S-121-2, Providence, RI, 02912, USA.Boston Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 850 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA, 02118, USA; Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of General Pediatrics, 88 East Newton Street, Vose Hall Room 322, Boston, MA, 02118, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Box G-S-121-2, Providence, RI, 02912, USA; Boston Medical Center Injury Prevention Center and Boston University School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, 771 Albany Street, Room 1332, Boston, MA, 02118, USA; The Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Rhode Island Hospital, 55 Claverick Street, Providence, RI 02903, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, 121 South Main Street, Box G-S-121-2, Providence, RI, 02912, USA. Electronic address: brandon_marshall@brown.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29241103

Citation

Bouvier, Benjamin A., et al. "Prevalence and Correlates of Benzodiazepine Use and Misuse Among Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Non-medically." Drug and Alcohol Dependence, vol. 183, 2018, pp. 73-77.
Bouvier BA, Waye KM, Elston B, et al. Prevalence and correlates of benzodiazepine use and misuse among young adults who use prescription opioids non-medically. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018;183:73-77.
Bouvier, B. A., Waye, K. M., Elston, B., Hadland, S. E., Green, T. C., & Marshall, B. D. L. (2018). Prevalence and correlates of benzodiazepine use and misuse among young adults who use prescription opioids non-medically. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 183, 73-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2017.10.023
Bouvier BA, et al. Prevalence and Correlates of Benzodiazepine Use and Misuse Among Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Non-medically. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2018 02 1;183:73-77. PubMed PMID: 29241103.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and correlates of benzodiazepine use and misuse among young adults who use prescription opioids non-medically. AU - Bouvier,Benjamin A, AU - Waye,Katherine M, AU - Elston,Beth, AU - Hadland,Scott E, AU - Green,Traci C, AU - Marshall,Brandon D L, Y1 - 2017/12/07/ PY - 2017/08/21/received PY - 2017/10/23/revised PY - 2017/10/28/accepted PY - 2017/12/15/pubmed PY - 2018/9/12/medline PY - 2017/12/15/entrez KW - Adolescent health KW - Comorbidity KW - Drugs KW - Mental health KW - Prescription drug misuse SP - 73 EP - 77 JF - Drug and alcohol dependence JO - Drug Alcohol Depend VL - 183 N2 - BACKGROUND: Benzodiazepine use dramatically increases the risk of unintentional overdose among people who use opioids non-medically. However, little is known about the patterns of co-occurring benzodiazepine and opioid use among young adults in the United States. METHODS: The Rhode Island Young Adult Prescription Drug Study (RAPiDS) was a cross-sectional study from January 2015-February 2016. RAPiDS recruited 200 young adults aged 18-29 who reported past 30-day non-medical prescription opioid (NMPO) use. Using Wilcoxon rank sum test and Fisher's exact test, we examined correlates associated with regular prescribed and non-medical use (defined as at least monthly) of benzodiazepines among NMPO users in Rhode Island. RESULTS: Among participants, 171 (85.5%) reported lifetime benzodiazepine use and 125 (62.5%) reported regular benzodiazepine use. Nearly all (n=121, 96.8%) reported non-medical use and 43 (34.4%) reported prescribed use. Compared to the 75 participants who did not regularly use benzodiazepines, participants who reported regular use were more likely to be white (66.3% vs. 58.0%, p=0.03), have ever been incarcerated (52.8% vs. 37.3%, p=0.04), and have ever been diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder (bipolar: 29.6% vs. 16.0%, p=0.04; anxiety: 56.8 vs. 36.0%, p=0.01). Although the association was marginally significant, accidental overdose was higher among those who were prescribed the benzodiazepine they used most frequently compared to those who were not (41.9% vs. 24.4%, p=0.06). CONCLUSION: Benzodiazepine use and misuse are highly prevalent among young adult NMPO users. Harm reduction and prevention programs for this population are urgently needed. SN - 1879-0046 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29241103/Prevalence_and_correlates_of_benzodiazepine_use_and_misuse_among_young_adults_who_use_prescription_opioids_non_medically_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0376-8716(17)30571-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -