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Management of Zika virus in pregnancy: a review.
Br Med Bull. 2017 Dec 01; 124(1):157-169.BM

Abstract

Introduction/background

Since 2015, an epidemic of Zika virus spread across the Americas. This coincided with an increased incidence of microcephaly reported at birth in Brazil, with subsequent evidence of a causal association.

Sources of data

Systemic reviews, observational studies, public health organizations.

Areas of agreement

Zika virus causes microcephaly and brain abnormalities in infants born to mothers infected during or shortly before pregnancy. Zika virus is a trigger for Guillain Barre Syndrome. Whilst mosquito bite is the main route of transmission, sexual transmission is another confirmed route.

Areas of controversy

Uncertainty remains regarding the proportion of Zika-infected pregnancies that will give rise to a significantly affected infant.

Growing points

The development of a vaccine remains a priority whilst public health efforts continue to educate at risk populations on reducing transmission.

Areas timely for developing research

Follow-up studies of affected infants are vital to inform on prognosis and guide screening programmes of the future.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Vascular Biology Research Centre, Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. Fetal Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Blackshaw Road, London, SW17 0QT, UK.Vascular Biology Research Centre, Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute, St George's, University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0RE, UK. Fetal Medicine Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Blackshaw Road, London, SW17 0QT, UK.Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England, Manor Farm Rd, Porton Down, Salisbury SP4 0JG, UK.Emerging Infections and Zoonoses, National Infection Service, Public Health England, 61 Colindale Avenue London, NW9 5EQ, UK.Institute for Women's Health, University College London Hospital, 74 Huntley Street, London, WC1E 6AU UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29253151

Citation

Perry, Helen, et al. "Management of Zika Virus in Pregnancy: a Review." British Medical Bulletin, vol. 124, no. 1, 2017, pp. 157-169.
Perry H, Khalil A, Aarons E, et al. Management of Zika virus in pregnancy: a review. Br Med Bull. 2017;124(1):157-169.
Perry, H., Khalil, A., Aarons, E., Russell, K., & O'Brien, P. (2017). Management of Zika virus in pregnancy: a review. British Medical Bulletin, 124(1), 157-169. https://doi.org/10.1093/bmb/ldx038v1
Perry H, et al. Management of Zika Virus in Pregnancy: a Review. Br Med Bull. 2017 Dec 1;124(1):157-169. PubMed PMID: 29253151.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Management of Zika virus in pregnancy: a review. AU - Perry,Helen, AU - Khalil,Asma, AU - Aarons,Emma, AU - Russell,Katherine, AU - O'Brien,Patrick, PY - 2017/12/19/entrez PY - 2017/12/19/pubmed PY - 2018/9/14/medline KW - Zika virus KW - microcephaly KW - pregnancy SP - 157 EP - 169 JF - British medical bulletin JO - Br Med Bull VL - 124 IS - 1 N2 - Introduction/background: Since 2015, an epidemic of Zika virus spread across the Americas. This coincided with an increased incidence of microcephaly reported at birth in Brazil, with subsequent evidence of a causal association. Sources of data: Systemic reviews, observational studies, public health organizations. Areas of agreement: Zika virus causes microcephaly and brain abnormalities in infants born to mothers infected during or shortly before pregnancy. Zika virus is a trigger for Guillain Barre Syndrome. Whilst mosquito bite is the main route of transmission, sexual transmission is another confirmed route. Areas of controversy: Uncertainty remains regarding the proportion of Zika-infected pregnancies that will give rise to a significantly affected infant. Growing points: The development of a vaccine remains a priority whilst public health efforts continue to educate at risk populations on reducing transmission. Areas timely for developing research: Follow-up studies of affected infants are vital to inform on prognosis and guide screening programmes of the future. SN - 1471-8391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29253151/Management_of_Zika_virus_in_pregnancy:_a_review_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/bmb/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/bmb/ldx038v1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -