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Dissolution and bandgap paradigms for predicting the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in the marine environment: an in vivo study with oyster embryos.
Nanotoxicology. 2018 02; 12(1):63-78.N

Abstract

Dissolution and bandgap paradigms have been proposed for predicting the ability of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) to induce oxidative stress in different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we addressed the effectiveness of these paradigms in vivo and under conditions typical of the marine environment, a final sink for many NPs released through aquatic systems. We used ZnO and MnO2 NPs as models for dissolution and bandgap paradigms, respectively, and CeO2 NPs to assess reactive oxygen radical (ROS) production via Fenton-like reactions in vivo. Oyster embryos were exposed to 0.5-500 μM of each test NP over 24 h and oxidative stress was determined as a primary toxicity pathway across successive levels of biological complexity, with arrested development as the main pathological outcome. NPs were actively ingested by oyster larvae and entered cells. Dissolution was a viable paradigm for predicting the toxicity of NPs in the marine environment, whereas the surface reactivity based paradigms (i.e. bandgap and ROS generation via Fenton-like reaction) were not supported under seawater conditions. Bio-imaging identified potential cellular storage-disposal sites of solid particles that could ameliorate the toxicological behavior of non-dissolving NPs, whilst abiotic screening of surface reactivity suggested that the adsorption-complexation of surface active sites by seawater ions could provide a valuable hypothesis to explain the quenching of the intrinsic oxidation potential of MnO2 NPs in seawater.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a College of Life and Environmental Sciences , University of Exeter , Exeter , UK.b College of Life and Environmental Sciences , Bioimaging Centre, University of Exeter , Exeter , UK.a College of Life and Environmental Sciences , University of Exeter , Exeter , UK.c Department of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Facility for Environmental Nanoscience Analysis and Characterization , University of Birmingham , Birmingham , UK.a College of Life and Environmental Sciences , University of Exeter , Exeter , UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29262761

Citation

Noventa, Seta, et al. "Dissolution and Bandgap Paradigms for Predicting the Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in the Marine Environment: an in Vivo Study With Oyster Embryos." Nanotoxicology, vol. 12, no. 1, 2018, pp. 63-78.
Noventa S, Hacker C, Rowe D, et al. Dissolution and bandgap paradigms for predicting the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in the marine environment: an in vivo study with oyster embryos. Nanotoxicology. 2018;12(1):63-78.
Noventa, S., Hacker, C., Rowe, D., Elgy, C., & Galloway, T. (2018). Dissolution and bandgap paradigms for predicting the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in the marine environment: an in vivo study with oyster embryos. Nanotoxicology, 12(1), 63-78. https://doi.org/10.1080/17435390.2017.1418920
Noventa S, et al. Dissolution and Bandgap Paradigms for Predicting the Toxicity of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in the Marine Environment: an in Vivo Study With Oyster Embryos. Nanotoxicology. 2018;12(1):63-78. PubMed PMID: 29262761.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dissolution and bandgap paradigms for predicting the toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in the marine environment: an in vivo study with oyster embryos. AU - Noventa,Seta, AU - Hacker,Christian, AU - Rowe,Darren, AU - Elgy,Christine, AU - Galloway,Tamara, Y1 - 2017/12/20/ PY - 2017/12/22/pubmed PY - 2018/12/18/medline PY - 2017/12/22/entrez KW - CeO2 KW - MnO2 KW - ZnO KW - hierarchical oxidative stress KW - seawater SP - 63 EP - 78 JF - Nanotoxicology JO - Nanotoxicology VL - 12 IS - 1 N2 - Dissolution and bandgap paradigms have been proposed for predicting the ability of metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) to induce oxidative stress in different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we addressed the effectiveness of these paradigms in vivo and under conditions typical of the marine environment, a final sink for many NPs released through aquatic systems. We used ZnO and MnO2 NPs as models for dissolution and bandgap paradigms, respectively, and CeO2 NPs to assess reactive oxygen radical (ROS) production via Fenton-like reactions in vivo. Oyster embryos were exposed to 0.5-500 μM of each test NP over 24 h and oxidative stress was determined as a primary toxicity pathway across successive levels of biological complexity, with arrested development as the main pathological outcome. NPs were actively ingested by oyster larvae and entered cells. Dissolution was a viable paradigm for predicting the toxicity of NPs in the marine environment, whereas the surface reactivity based paradigms (i.e. bandgap and ROS generation via Fenton-like reaction) were not supported under seawater conditions. Bio-imaging identified potential cellular storage-disposal sites of solid particles that could ameliorate the toxicological behavior of non-dissolving NPs, whilst abiotic screening of surface reactivity suggested that the adsorption-complexation of surface active sites by seawater ions could provide a valuable hypothesis to explain the quenching of the intrinsic oxidation potential of MnO2 NPs in seawater. SN - 1743-5404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29262761/Dissolution_and_bandgap_paradigms_for_predicting_the_toxicity_of_metal_oxide_nanoparticles_in_the_marine_environment:_an_in_vivo_study_with_oyster_embryos_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17435390.2017.1418920 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -