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Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings from the PINE Study.
Gerontology 2018; 64(3):246-256G

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Social network has been identified as a protective factor for cognitive impairment. However, the relationship between social network and global and subdomains of cognitive function remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE

This study aims to provide an analytic framework to examine quantity, composition, and quality of social network and investigate the association between social network, global cognition, and cognitive domains among US Chinese older adults.

METHODS

Data were derived from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly (PINE), a community-engaged, population-based epidemiological study of US Chinese older adults aged 60 and above in the greater Chicago area, with a sample size of 3,157. Social network was assessed by network size, volume of contact, proportion kin, proportion female, proportion co-resident, and emotional closeness. Cognitive function was evaluated by global cognition, episodic memory, executive function, working memory, and Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination (C-MMSE). Linear regression and quantile regression were performed.

RESULTS

Every 1-point increase in network size (b = 0.048, p < 0.001) and volume of contact (b = 0.049, p < 0.01) and every 1-point decrease in proportion kin (b = -0.240, p < 0.01) and proportion co-resident (b = -0.099, p < 0.05) were associated with higher level of global cognition. Similar trends were observed in specific cognitive domains, including episodic memory, working memory, executive function, and C-MMSE. However, emotional closeness was only significantly associated with C-MMSE (b = 0.076, p < 0.01). Social network has differential effects on female versus male older adults.

CONCLUSION

This study found that social network dimensions have different relationships with global and domains of cognitive function. Quantitative and structural aspects of social network were essential to maintain an optimal level of cognitive function. Qualitative aspects of social network were protective factors for C-MMSE. It is necessary for public health practitioners to consider interventions that enhance different aspects of older adults' social network.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29268272

Citation

Li, Mengting, and Xinqi Dong. "Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings From the PINE Study." Gerontology, vol. 64, no. 3, 2018, pp. 246-256.
Li M, Dong X. Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings from the PINE Study. Gerontology. 2018;64(3):246-256.
Li, M., & Dong, X. (2018). Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings from the PINE Study. Gerontology, 64(3), pp. 246-256. doi:10.1159/000485616.
Li M, Dong X. Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings From the PINE Study. Gerontology. 2018;64(3):246-256. PubMed PMID: 29268272.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is Social Network a Protective Factor for Cognitive Impairment in US Chinese Older Adults? Findings from the PINE Study. AU - Li,Mengting, AU - Dong,Xinqi, Y1 - 2017/12/22/ PY - 2017/05/08/received PY - 2017/11/23/accepted PY - 2017/12/22/pubmed PY - 2018/11/27/medline PY - 2017/12/22/entrez KW - Chinese KW - Cognitive function KW - Episodic memory KW - Executive function KW - Mini-Mental State Examination KW - Older adults KW - Social network KW - Working memory SP - 246 EP - 256 JF - Gerontology JO - Gerontology VL - 64 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Social network has been identified as a protective factor for cognitive impairment. However, the relationship between social network and global and subdomains of cognitive function remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to provide an analytic framework to examine quantity, composition, and quality of social network and investigate the association between social network, global cognition, and cognitive domains among US Chinese older adults. METHODS: Data were derived from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly (PINE), a community-engaged, population-based epidemiological study of US Chinese older adults aged 60 and above in the greater Chicago area, with a sample size of 3,157. Social network was assessed by network size, volume of contact, proportion kin, proportion female, proportion co-resident, and emotional closeness. Cognitive function was evaluated by global cognition, episodic memory, executive function, working memory, and Chinese Mini-Mental State Examination (C-MMSE). Linear regression and quantile regression were performed. RESULTS: Every 1-point increase in network size (b = 0.048, p < 0.001) and volume of contact (b = 0.049, p < 0.01) and every 1-point decrease in proportion kin (b = -0.240, p < 0.01) and proportion co-resident (b = -0.099, p < 0.05) were associated with higher level of global cognition. Similar trends were observed in specific cognitive domains, including episodic memory, working memory, executive function, and C-MMSE. However, emotional closeness was only significantly associated with C-MMSE (b = 0.076, p < 0.01). Social network has differential effects on female versus male older adults. CONCLUSION: This study found that social network dimensions have different relationships with global and domains of cognitive function. Quantitative and structural aspects of social network were essential to maintain an optimal level of cognitive function. Qualitative aspects of social network were protective factors for C-MMSE. It is necessary for public health practitioners to consider interventions that enhance different aspects of older adults' social network. SN - 1423-0003 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29268272/Is_Social_Network_a_Protective_Factor_for_Cognitive_Impairment_in_US_Chinese_Older_Adults_Findings_from_the_PINE_Study_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000485616 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -