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Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand.
Nicotine Tob Res. 2018 09 04; 20(10):1265-1271.NT

Abstract

Introduction

E-cigarettes have potential to support tobacco cessation or reduction, but how nicotine content affects smokers' subjective perceptions and use of e-cigarettes, rather than tobacco, is unclear.

Method

Thirty-five adult daily smokers who had not previously tried e-cigarettes were recruited from two cities in New Zealand in 2016-2017. Smokers were given four e-cigarette cartridges (0, 6, 12, and 18 mg nicotine) in a randomized, blinded order over four 2-week periods. Daily cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use was monitored using ecological momentary analysis and participants completed the modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire after each 2-week period.

Results

Mean cigarettes per day decreased by 37% (9.69 to 6.09) when e-cigarettes were available relative to baseline (p = .008). Nicotine-containing cartridges (>0 mg) were associated with greater use (p = .023) and craving reduction (p = .026) than 0 mg. Alleviation of withdrawal symptoms (p = .048) and taste and enjoyment factors (p = .039) predicted e-cigarette use.

Conclusion

Availability of e-cigarettes reduced cigarette smoking behavior regardless of nicotine content, and e-cigarette use was greater with nicotine-containing cartridges. First-time users' e-cigarette use can be predicted using subjective ratings and more research is required to clarify the effect of nicotine content on subjective perceptions and use.

Implications

For low-moderate dependence smokers, availability of e-cigarettes may reduce cigarette smoking behavior regardless of nicotine content, but the availability of nicotine-containing cartridges may promote greater e-cigarette use. First response to trialing e-cigarettes is an important factor in determining subsequent experimental and possibly longer-term use.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.Health New Zealand Ltd., Christchurch, New Zealand.National Institute for Health Innovation, School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29272446

Citation

Tucker, Megan R., et al. "Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand." Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, vol. 20, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1265-1271.
Tucker MR, Laugesen M, Bullen C, et al. Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand. Nicotine Tob Res. 2018;20(10):1265-1271.
Tucker, M. R., Laugesen, M., Bullen, C., & Grace, R. C. (2018). Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand. Nicotine & Tobacco Research : Official Journal of the Society for Research On Nicotine and Tobacco, 20(10), 1265-1271. https://doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntx269
Tucker MR, et al. Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand. Nicotine Tob Res. 2018 09 4;20(10):1265-1271. PubMed PMID: 29272446.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting Short-Term Uptake of Electronic Cigarettes: Effects of Nicotine, Subjective Effects, and Simulated Demand. AU - Tucker,Megan R, AU - Laugesen,Murray, AU - Bullen,Chris, AU - Grace,Randolph C, PY - 2017/05/12/received PY - 2017/12/07/accepted PY - 2017/12/23/pubmed PY - 2019/9/19/medline PY - 2017/12/23/entrez SP - 1265 EP - 1271 JF - Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco JO - Nicotine Tob Res VL - 20 IS - 10 N2 - Introduction: E-cigarettes have potential to support tobacco cessation or reduction, but how nicotine content affects smokers' subjective perceptions and use of e-cigarettes, rather than tobacco, is unclear. Method: Thirty-five adult daily smokers who had not previously tried e-cigarettes were recruited from two cities in New Zealand in 2016-2017. Smokers were given four e-cigarette cartridges (0, 6, 12, and 18 mg nicotine) in a randomized, blinded order over four 2-week periods. Daily cigarette smoking and e-cigarette use was monitored using ecological momentary analysis and participants completed the modified Cigarette Evaluation Questionnaire after each 2-week period. Results: Mean cigarettes per day decreased by 37% (9.69 to 6.09) when e-cigarettes were available relative to baseline (p = .008). Nicotine-containing cartridges (>0 mg) were associated with greater use (p = .023) and craving reduction (p = .026) than 0 mg. Alleviation of withdrawal symptoms (p = .048) and taste and enjoyment factors (p = .039) predicted e-cigarette use. Conclusion: Availability of e-cigarettes reduced cigarette smoking behavior regardless of nicotine content, and e-cigarette use was greater with nicotine-containing cartridges. First-time users' e-cigarette use can be predicted using subjective ratings and more research is required to clarify the effect of nicotine content on subjective perceptions and use. Implications: For low-moderate dependence smokers, availability of e-cigarettes may reduce cigarette smoking behavior regardless of nicotine content, but the availability of nicotine-containing cartridges may promote greater e-cigarette use. First response to trialing e-cigarettes is an important factor in determining subsequent experimental and possibly longer-term use. SN - 1469-994X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29272446/Predicting_Short_Term_Uptake_of_Electronic_Cigarettes:_Effects_of_Nicotine_Subjective_Effects_and_Simulated_Demand_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -