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An intercept study to measure the extent to which New Zealand university students pre-game.
Aust N Z J Public Health 2018; 42(1):30-34AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to quantify the degree to which students pre-gamed in New Zealand, using self-report and breathalysers.

METHODS

A total of 569 New Zealand undergraduate students were interviewed (men = 45.2%; first year = 81.4%) entering three university-run concerts. We asked participants to report how many drinks they had consumed, their self-reported intoxication and the duration of their pre-gaming session. We then recorded participants' Breath Alcohol Concentration (BrAC; µg/L) and the time they arrived at the event.

RESULTS

The number of participants who reported consuming alcohol before the event was 504 (88.6%) and the number of standard drinks consumed was high (M=6.9; median=6.0). A total of 237 (41.7%) participants could not have their BrAC recorded due to having consumed alcohol ≤10 minutes before the interview. The remaining 332 participants (57.3%) recorded a mean BrAC of 288.8µg/L (median=280.0 µg/L). Gender, off-campus accommodation, length of pre-gaming drinking session, and time of arrival at the event were all associated with increased pre-gaming. Conclusion and implications for public health: Pre-gaming was the norm for students. Universities must take pre-gaming into account; policy implications include earlier start times of events and limiting students' access to alcohol prior to events.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Victoria.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.Department of Psychology, University of Otago, New Zealand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29281165

Citation

Riordan, Benjamin C., et al. "An Intercept Study to Measure the Extent to Which New Zealand University Students Pre-game." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 42, no. 1, 2018, pp. 30-34.
Riordan BC, Conner TS, Flett JAM, et al. An intercept study to measure the extent to which New Zealand university students pre-game. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2018;42(1):30-34.
Riordan, B. C., Conner, T. S., Flett, J. A. M., Droste, N., Cody, L., Brookie, K. L., ... Scarf, D. (2018). An intercept study to measure the extent to which New Zealand university students pre-game. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42(1), pp. 30-34. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12754.
Riordan BC, et al. An Intercept Study to Measure the Extent to Which New Zealand University Students Pre-game. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2018;42(1):30-34. PubMed PMID: 29281165.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An intercept study to measure the extent to which New Zealand university students pre-game. AU - Riordan,Benjamin C, AU - Conner,Tamlin S, AU - Flett,Jayde A M, AU - Droste,Nic, AU - Cody,Louise, AU - Brookie,Kate L, AU - Riordan,Jessica K, AU - Scarf,Damian, Y1 - 2017/12/27/ PY - 2017/06/01/received PY - 2017/08/01/revised PY - 2017/10/01/accepted PY - 2017/12/28/pubmed PY - 2018/9/19/medline PY - 2017/12/28/entrez KW - alcohol KW - heavy drinking KW - high-intensity drinking KW - pre-gaming KW - university SP - 30 EP - 34 JF - Australian and New Zealand journal of public health JO - Aust N Z J Public Health VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We aimed to quantify the degree to which students pre-gamed in New Zealand, using self-report and breathalysers. METHODS: A total of 569 New Zealand undergraduate students were interviewed (men = 45.2%; first year = 81.4%) entering three university-run concerts. We asked participants to report how many drinks they had consumed, their self-reported intoxication and the duration of their pre-gaming session. We then recorded participants' Breath Alcohol Concentration (BrAC; µg/L) and the time they arrived at the event. RESULTS: The number of participants who reported consuming alcohol before the event was 504 (88.6%) and the number of standard drinks consumed was high (M=6.9; median=6.0). A total of 237 (41.7%) participants could not have their BrAC recorded due to having consumed alcohol ≤10 minutes before the interview. The remaining 332 participants (57.3%) recorded a mean BrAC of 288.8µg/L (median=280.0 µg/L). Gender, off-campus accommodation, length of pre-gaming drinking session, and time of arrival at the event were all associated with increased pre-gaming. Conclusion and implications for public health: Pre-gaming was the norm for students. Universities must take pre-gaming into account; policy implications include earlier start times of events and limiting students' access to alcohol prior to events. SN - 1753-6405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29281165/An_intercept_study_to_measure_the_extent_to_which_New_Zealand_university_students_pre_game_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12754 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -