Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes.
Biol Pharm Bull 2018; 41(1):106-114BP

Abstract

To evaluate the capability of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes (h-iPS-HEP) in drug metabolism, the profiles of the metabolites of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid, and acetylfentanyl, an N-acetyl analog of fentanyl, in the cells were determined and analyzed. Commercially available h-iPS-HEP were incubated with fentanyl or acetylfentanyl for 24 or 48 h. After enzymatic hydrolysis, the medium was deproteinized with acetonitrile, then analyzed by LC/MS. Desphenethylated metabolites and some hydroxylated metabolites, including 4'-hydroxy-fentanyl and β-hydroxy-fentanyl, were detected as metabolites of fentanyl and acetylfentanyl in the medium. The main metabolite of fentanyl with h-iPS-HEP was the desphenethylated metabolite, which was in agreement with in vivo results. These results suggest that h-iPS-HEP may be useful as a tool for investigating drug metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.National Research Institute of Police Science.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29311471

Citation

Kanamori, Tatsuyuki, et al. "Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes." Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol. 41, no. 1, 2018, pp. 106-114.
Kanamori T, Togawa Iwata Y, Segawa H, et al. Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes. Biol Pharm Bull. 2018;41(1):106-114.
Kanamori, T., Togawa Iwata, Y., Segawa, H., Yamamuro, T., Kuwayama, K., Tsujikawa, K., & Inoue, H. (2018). Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes. Biological & Pharmaceutical Bulletin, 41(1), pp. 106-114. doi:10.1248/bpb.b17-00709.
Kanamori T, et al. Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes. Biol Pharm Bull. 2018;41(1):106-114. PubMed PMID: 29311471.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolism of Fentanyl and Acetylfentanyl in Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes. AU - Kanamori,Tatsuyuki, AU - Togawa Iwata,Yuko, AU - Segawa,Hiroki, AU - Yamamuro,Tadashi, AU - Kuwayama,Kenji, AU - Tsujikawa,Kenji, AU - Inoue,Hiroyuki, PY - 2018/1/10/entrez PY - 2018/1/10/pubmed PY - 2018/8/14/medline KW - fentanyl KW - hepatocyte KW - induced pluripotent stem cell KW - metabolism SP - 106 EP - 114 JF - Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin JO - Biol. Pharm. Bull. VL - 41 IS - 1 N2 - To evaluate the capability of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes (h-iPS-HEP) in drug metabolism, the profiles of the metabolites of fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opioid, and acetylfentanyl, an N-acetyl analog of fentanyl, in the cells were determined and analyzed. Commercially available h-iPS-HEP were incubated with fentanyl or acetylfentanyl for 24 or 48 h. After enzymatic hydrolysis, the medium was deproteinized with acetonitrile, then analyzed by LC/MS. Desphenethylated metabolites and some hydroxylated metabolites, including 4'-hydroxy-fentanyl and β-hydroxy-fentanyl, were detected as metabolites of fentanyl and acetylfentanyl in the medium. The main metabolite of fentanyl with h-iPS-HEP was the desphenethylated metabolite, which was in agreement with in vivo results. These results suggest that h-iPS-HEP may be useful as a tool for investigating drug metabolism. SN - 1347-5215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29311471/Metabolism_of_Fentanyl_and_Acetylfentanyl_in_Human-Induced_Pluripotent_Stem_Cell-Derived_Hepatocytes L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1248/bpb.b17-00709 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -