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The antimalarial drug amodiaquine possesses anti-ZIKA virus activities.

Abstract

Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak has emerged as a global health threat, particularly in tropical areas, over the past few years. No antiviral therapy or vaccine is available at present. For these reasons, repurposing clinically approved drugs against ZIKV infection may provide rapid and cost-effective global health benefits. Here, we explored this strategy and screened eight FDA-approved drugs for antiviral activity against ZIKV using a cell-based assay. Our results show that the antimalarial drug amodiaquine has anti-ZIKV activity with EC50 at low micromolar concentrations in cell culture. We further characterized amodiaquine antiviral activity against ZIKV and found that it targets early events of the viral replication cycle. Altogether, our results suggest that amodiaquine may be efficacious for the treatment of ZIKV infection.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

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    McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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    McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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    McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

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    McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

    McGill University AIDS Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

    Source

    Journal of medical virology 90:5 2018 May pg 796-802

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29315671