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Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting.
Int J Mol Sci 2018; 19(1)IJ

Abstract

Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) is the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), especially in Western diet. A high omega-6/omega-3 ratio in Western diets is implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes. Studies in animal models and in humans have demonstrated beneficial effects of omega-3 PUFA (n-3 PUFA) in a variety of diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias and inflammatory diseases, as well as breast and colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of n-3 PUFA are still not well understood. Possible mechanisms include competition between n-3 and n-6 PUFAs at the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 levels, and subsequent formation of oxylipins with specific anti-inflammatory or anti-arrhythmic effects. In this study, we report the impact of routine long-term treatment with prescription-grade n-3 PUFA (either 840 mg or 1680 mg per day) on blood cell membrane fatty acid composition, as well as plasma oxylipin patterns, in a patient population with severe hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease who are on standard lipid-lowering and cardioprotective medications. Lipidomics analyses were performed by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Supplementation led to a dose-dependent increase in n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the blood cell fraction. We also observed a dose-dependent increase in EPA- and DHA-derived epoxy metabolites, whereas the effect of n-3 PUFA supplementation on LOX-dependent EPA- and DHA-derived hydroxy metabolites was less pronounced, with a tendency towards lower metabolites in subjects with higher n-3 PUFA levels. These data thus generally confirm effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation observed previously in healthy individuals. Additionally, they indicate a suppressive effect of high n-3 PUFA supplementation on the formation of LOX metabolites in the context of concomitant aspirin medication.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology, Oncology, Hematology, Rheumatology and Diabetes, Ruppiner Kliniken, Brandenburg Medical School, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany. ChrisSchmoecker@web.de. Department of Gastroenterology, Sana Klinikum Lichtenberg, 10365 Berlin, Germany. ChrisSchmoecker@web.de.Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité University Medicine, 13353 Berlin, Germany. ingrid-wei.zhang@charite.de.Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology, Oncology, Hematology, Rheumatology and Diabetes, Ruppiner Kliniken, Brandenburg Medical School, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany. S.Kiesler@ruppiner-kliniken.de.Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité University Medicine, 13353 Berlin, Germany. Ursula.Kassner@charite.de.Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Wuppertal, 42119 Wuppertal, Germany. annika.ostermann@schebb-web.de. Institute for Food Toxicology, University for Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30559 Hannover, Germany. annika.ostermann@schebb-web.de.Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité University Medicine, 13353 Berlin, Germany. Elisabeth.Steinhagen-Thiessen@charite.de.Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Wuppertal, 42119 Wuppertal, Germany. nils@schebb-web.de. Institute for Food Toxicology, University for Veterinary Medicine Hannover, 30559 Hannover, Germany. nils@schebb-web.de.Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology, Oncology, Hematology, Rheumatology and Diabetes, Ruppiner Kliniken, Brandenburg Medical School, 16816 Neuruppin, Germany. karsten.weylandt@mhb-fontane.de. Medical Department, Division of Gastroenterology and Nephrology, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charité University Medicine, 13353 Berlin, Germany. karsten.weylandt@mhb-fontane.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29316682

Citation

Schmöcker, Christoph, et al. "Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation On Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting." International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 19, no. 1, 2018.
Schmöcker C, Zhang IW, Kiesler S, et al. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting. Int J Mol Sci. 2018;19(1).
Schmöcker, C., Zhang, I. W., Kiesler, S., Kassner, U., Ostermann, A. I., Steinhagen-Thiessen, E., ... Weylandt, K. H. (2018). Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(1), doi:10.3390/ijms19010180.
Schmöcker C, et al. Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation On Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting. Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Jan 8;19(1) PubMed PMID: 29316682.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation on Oxylipins in a Routine Clinical Setting. AU - Schmöcker,Christoph, AU - Zhang,Ingrid W, AU - Kiesler,Stefanie, AU - Kassner,Ursula, AU - Ostermann,Annika I, AU - Steinhagen-Thiessen,Elisabeth, AU - Schebb,Nils H, AU - Weylandt,Karsten-H, Y1 - 2018/01/08/ PY - 2017/10/31/received PY - 2018/01/03/revised PY - 2018/01/04/accepted PY - 2018/1/11/entrez PY - 2018/1/11/pubmed PY - 2018/7/28/medline KW - hyperlipidemia KW - lipid clinic KW - lipidomics KW - omega-3 fatty acids KW - oxylipins JF - International journal of molecular sciences JO - Int J Mol Sci VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - Omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (n-6 PUFA) is the predominant polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), especially in Western diet. A high omega-6/omega-3 ratio in Western diets is implicated in the development of cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory processes. Studies in animal models and in humans have demonstrated beneficial effects of omega-3 PUFA (n-3 PUFA) in a variety of diseases, including cardiac arrhythmias and inflammatory diseases, as well as breast and colon cancer. The molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of n-3 PUFA are still not well understood. Possible mechanisms include competition between n-3 and n-6 PUFAs at the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) and cytochrome P450 levels, and subsequent formation of oxylipins with specific anti-inflammatory or anti-arrhythmic effects. In this study, we report the impact of routine long-term treatment with prescription-grade n-3 PUFA (either 840 mg or 1680 mg per day) on blood cell membrane fatty acid composition, as well as plasma oxylipin patterns, in a patient population with severe hyperlipidemia and cardiovascular disease who are on standard lipid-lowering and cardioprotective medications. Lipidomics analyses were performed by LC/ESI-MS/MS. Supplementation led to a dose-dependent increase in n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in the blood cell fraction. We also observed a dose-dependent increase in EPA- and DHA-derived epoxy metabolites, whereas the effect of n-3 PUFA supplementation on LOX-dependent EPA- and DHA-derived hydroxy metabolites was less pronounced, with a tendency towards lower metabolites in subjects with higher n-3 PUFA levels. These data thus generally confirm effects of n-3 PUFA supplementation observed previously in healthy individuals. Additionally, they indicate a suppressive effect of high n-3 PUFA supplementation on the formation of LOX metabolites in the context of concomitant aspirin medication. SN - 1422-0067 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29316682/Effect_of_Omega_3_Fatty_Acid_Supplementation_on_Oxylipins_in_a_Routine_Clinical_Setting_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=ijms19010180 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -