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Immigration, political trust, and Brexit - Testing an aversion amplification hypothesis.
Br J Soc Psychol 2018; 57(2):310-326BJ

Abstract

A few weeks prior to the EU referendum (23rd June 2016) two broadly representative samples of the electorate were drawn in Kent (the south-east of England, N = 1,001) and Scotland (N = 1,088) for online surveys that measured their trust in politicians, concerns about acceptable levels of immigration, threat from immigration, European identification, and voting intention. We tested an aversion amplification hypothesis that the impact of immigration concerns on threat and identification would be amplified when political trust was low. We hypothesized that the effect of aversion amplification on voting intentions would be mediated first by perceived threat from immigration, and then by (dis) identification with Europe. Results in both samples were consistent with this hypothesis and suggest that voters were most likely to reject the political status quo (choose Brexit) when concerns that immigration levels were too high were combined with a low level of trust in politicians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for the Study of Group Processes, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.Centre for the Study of Group Processes, School of Psychology, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29318624

Citation

Abrams, Dominic, and Giovanni A. Travaglino. "Immigration, Political Trust, and Brexit - Testing an Aversion Amplification Hypothesis." The British Journal of Social Psychology, vol. 57, no. 2, 2018, pp. 310-326.
Abrams D, Travaglino GA. Immigration, political trust, and Brexit - Testing an aversion amplification hypothesis. Br J Soc Psychol. 2018;57(2):310-326.
Abrams, D., & Travaglino, G. A. (2018). Immigration, political trust, and Brexit - Testing an aversion amplification hypothesis. The British Journal of Social Psychology, 57(2), pp. 310-326. doi:10.1111/bjso.12233.
Abrams D, Travaglino GA. Immigration, Political Trust, and Brexit - Testing an Aversion Amplification Hypothesis. Br J Soc Psychol. 2018;57(2):310-326. PubMed PMID: 29318624.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Immigration, political trust, and Brexit - Testing an aversion amplification hypothesis. AU - Abrams,Dominic, AU - Travaglino,Giovanni A, Y1 - 2018/01/10/ PY - 2017/05/28/received PY - 2017/11/28/revised PY - 2018/1/11/pubmed PY - 2018/9/13/medline PY - 2018/1/11/entrez KW - European identity KW - immigration KW - political trust KW - threat KW - voting behaviour SP - 310 EP - 326 JF - The British journal of social psychology JO - Br J Soc Psychol VL - 57 IS - 2 N2 - A few weeks prior to the EU referendum (23rd June 2016) two broadly representative samples of the electorate were drawn in Kent (the south-east of England, N = 1,001) and Scotland (N = 1,088) for online surveys that measured their trust in politicians, concerns about acceptable levels of immigration, threat from immigration, European identification, and voting intention. We tested an aversion amplification hypothesis that the impact of immigration concerns on threat and identification would be amplified when political trust was low. We hypothesized that the effect of aversion amplification on voting intentions would be mediated first by perceived threat from immigration, and then by (dis) identification with Europe. Results in both samples were consistent with this hypothesis and suggest that voters were most likely to reject the political status quo (choose Brexit) when concerns that immigration levels were too high were combined with a low level of trust in politicians. SN - 2044-8309 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29318624/Immigration_political_trust_and_Brexit___Testing_an_aversion_amplification_hypothesis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/bjso.12233 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -