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Tetrapod distribution and temperature rise during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction.
Proc Biol Sci. 2018 01 10; 285(1870)PB

Abstract

The Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) had an enormous impact on life in three ways: by substantially reducing diversity, by reshuffling the composition of ecosystems and by expelling life from the tropics following episodes of intense global warming. But was there really an 'equatorial tetrapod gap', and how long did it last? Here, we consider both skeletal and footprint data, and find a more complex pattern: (i) tetrapods were distributed both at high and low latitudes during this time; (ii) there was a clear geographic disjunction through the PTME, with tetrapod distribution shifting 10-15° poleward; and (iii) there was a rapid expansion phase across the whole of Pangea following the PTME. These changes are consistent with a model of generalized migration of tetrapods to higher latitudinal, cooler regions, to escape from the superhot equatorial climate in the earliest Triassic, but the effect was shorter in time scale, and not as pronounced as had been proposed. In the recovery phase following the PTME, this episode of forced range expansion also appears to have promoted the emergence and radiation of entirely new groups, such as the archosaurs, including the dinosaurs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MUSE-Museo delle Scienze, Corso del Lavoro e della Scienza, 3, 38122 Trento, Italy massimo.bernardi@muse.it. School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK.MUSE-Museo delle Scienze, Corso del Lavoro e della Scienza, 3, 38122 Trento, Italy. PaleoFactory - Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, Rome 00185, Italy.School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29321300

Citation

Bernardi, Massimo, et al. "Tetrapod Distribution and Temperature Rise During the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction." Proceedings. Biological Sciences, vol. 285, no. 1870, 2018.
Bernardi M, Petti FM, Benton MJ. Tetrapod distribution and temperature rise during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Proc Biol Sci. 2018;285(1870).
Bernardi, M., Petti, F. M., & Benton, M. J. (2018). Tetrapod distribution and temperature rise during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. Proceedings. Biological Sciences, 285(1870). https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2017.2331
Bernardi M, Petti FM, Benton MJ. Tetrapod Distribution and Temperature Rise During the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction. Proc Biol Sci. 2018 01 10;285(1870) PubMed PMID: 29321300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tetrapod distribution and temperature rise during the Permian-Triassic mass extinction. AU - Bernardi,Massimo, AU - Petti,Fabio Massimo, AU - Benton,Michael J, PY - 2017/10/18/received PY - 2017/12/04/accepted PY - 2018/1/12/entrez PY - 2018/1/13/pubmed PY - 2019/1/27/medline KW - global warming KW - palaeobiogeography KW - range expansion JF - Proceedings. Biological sciences JO - Proc Biol Sci VL - 285 IS - 1870 N2 - The Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) had an enormous impact on life in three ways: by substantially reducing diversity, by reshuffling the composition of ecosystems and by expelling life from the tropics following episodes of intense global warming. But was there really an 'equatorial tetrapod gap', and how long did it last? Here, we consider both skeletal and footprint data, and find a more complex pattern: (i) tetrapods were distributed both at high and low latitudes during this time; (ii) there was a clear geographic disjunction through the PTME, with tetrapod distribution shifting 10-15° poleward; and (iii) there was a rapid expansion phase across the whole of Pangea following the PTME. These changes are consistent with a model of generalized migration of tetrapods to higher latitudinal, cooler regions, to escape from the superhot equatorial climate in the earliest Triassic, but the effect was shorter in time scale, and not as pronounced as had been proposed. In the recovery phase following the PTME, this episode of forced range expansion also appears to have promoted the emergence and radiation of entirely new groups, such as the archosaurs, including the dinosaurs. SN - 1471-2954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29321300/Tetrapod_distribution_and_temperature_rise_during_the_Permian_Triassic_mass_extinction_ L2 - https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2017.2331?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -