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A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude.
Wilderness Environ Med 2018; 29(1):85-89WE

Abstract

A 24-year-old man presented with acute abdominal pain upon ascent to moderate altitude (3500 m). An immediate evaluation revealed a splenic infarct, and he was evacuated to sea level. Upon recovery, he was sent back to 3500 m without detailed etiological evaluation, whereupon he experienced recurrent episodes of left-side subcostal pain. Imaging suggested autosplenectomy, and workup revealed a negative thrombophilia profile but was positive for sickle cell trait (SCT). Individuals with SCT can be asymptomatic until exposure to severe hypoxia, upon which they can manifest clinically as sickle cell syndrome. We discuss the rare presentation of autosplenectomy in a patient with previously undiagnosed SCT on exposure to high altitude.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Hematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India (Dr Das); Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Hematology Division, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India (Drs Yanamandra, Malhotra, and Varma). Electronic address: hematpgi@gmail.com.Department of Hematology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India (Dr Das).Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Hematology Division, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India (Drs Yanamandra, Malhotra, and Varma).Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Hematology Division, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education & Research, Chandigarh, India (Drs Yanamandra, Malhotra, and Varma).

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29331296

Citation

Yanamandra, Uday, et al. "A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude." Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, vol. 29, no. 1, 2018, pp. 85-89.
Yanamandra U, Das R, Malhotra P, et al. A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude. Wilderness Environ Med. 2018;29(1):85-89.
Yanamandra, U., Das, R., Malhotra, P., & Varma, S. (2018). A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, 29(1), pp. 85-89. doi:10.1016/j.wem.2017.08.021.
Yanamandra U, et al. A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude. Wilderness Environ Med. 2018;29(1):85-89. PubMed PMID: 29331296.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Case of Autosplenectomy in Sickle Cell Trait Following an Exposure to High Altitude. AU - Yanamandra,Uday, AU - Das,Reena, AU - Malhotra,Pankaj, AU - Varma,Subhash, Y1 - 2018/01/10/ PY - 2016/11/01/received PY - 2017/08/24/revised PY - 2017/08/25/accepted PY - 2018/1/15/pubmed PY - 2018/9/7/medline PY - 2018/1/15/entrez KW - sickle crisis KW - sickling syndrome KW - splenic infarct SP - 85 EP - 89 JF - Wilderness & environmental medicine JO - Wilderness Environ Med VL - 29 IS - 1 N2 - A 24-year-old man presented with acute abdominal pain upon ascent to moderate altitude (3500 m). An immediate evaluation revealed a splenic infarct, and he was evacuated to sea level. Upon recovery, he was sent back to 3500 m without detailed etiological evaluation, whereupon he experienced recurrent episodes of left-side subcostal pain. Imaging suggested autosplenectomy, and workup revealed a negative thrombophilia profile but was positive for sickle cell trait (SCT). Individuals with SCT can be asymptomatic until exposure to severe hypoxia, upon which they can manifest clinically as sickle cell syndrome. We discuss the rare presentation of autosplenectomy in a patient with previously undiagnosed SCT on exposure to high altitude. SN - 1545-1534 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29331296/A_Case_of_Autosplenectomy_in_Sickle_Cell_Trait_Following_an_Exposure_to_High_Altitude L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1080-6032(17)30256-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -