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Prevalence and comorbidity of sleep conditions in Australian adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation national survey.
Sleep Health 2018; 4(1):13-19SH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the prevalence of sleep conditions (obstructive sleep apnea [OSA], insomnia symptoms, simple snoring, and restless legs) and their associated burden of chronic conditions in a community sample.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional national adult online survey.

SETTING

Community-based sample.

PARTICIPANTS

Australian adults ≥18 years, N = 1011.

MEASUREMENTS

A cross-sectional national online survey assessed diagnosed OSA, OSA symptoms, insomnia symptoms, sleep problems, excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale ≥11), and physician-diagnosed health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, reflux disease, lung disease, depression, anxiety/panic disorder, arthritis). Possible undiagnosed OSA was estimated using self-reported frequent loud snoring and witness apneas. International Criteria for Sleep Disorders-3 criteria identified insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, obesity, and smoking determined correlates of sleep disorders.

RESULTS

Comorbid sleep conditions were common, with 56% of participants demonstrating ≥1 condition. Reporting ≥1 mental health condition (depression and/or anxiety) was independently associated with diagnosed OSA (odds ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 6.6 [3.2-13.6]), undiagnosed OSA (3.2 [1.8-5.8]), simple snoring (2.4 [1.2-4.5]), insomnia symptoms (4.3 [2.5-7.3]), and restless legs (1.9 [1.2-3.1]). Diagnosed OSA was significantly associated with ≥1 cardiometabolic condition (2.9 [1.4-6.0]) and arthritis (3.6 [1.8-7.2]). ESS ≥11 was associated with diagnosed (3.1 [1.4-6.8]) and undiagnosed OSA (6.2 [3.4-11.4]), insomnia symptoms (2.6 [1.4-4.9]), and restless legs (2.3 [1.4-4.0]), and these sleep conditions were also significantly associated with ≥2 diagnosed medical problems.

CONCLUSION

Strategies to facilitate the diagnosis and management of often comorbid sleep disorders in primary care are required to reduce the significant sleep-related disparities in cardiometabolic and mental health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Health Observatory, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus, Woodville, South Australia, Australia; Freemason's Centre for Men's Health, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. Electronic address: sarah.appleton@adelaide.edu.au.Population Research & Outcomes Studies, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.The Health Observatory, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus, Woodville, South Australia, Australia.Population Research & Outcomes Studies, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Adelaide Institute of Sleep Health, A Flinders Centre of Excellence, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia; Department of Medicine, Flinders University, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Discipline of General Practice, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.Discipline of General Practice, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia.The Health Observatory, Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, The Queen Elizabeth Hospital Campus, Woodville, South Australia, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29332673

Citation

Appleton, Sarah L., et al. "Prevalence and Comorbidity of Sleep Conditions in Australian Adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation National Survey." Sleep Health, vol. 4, no. 1, 2018, pp. 13-19.
Appleton SL, Gill TK, Lang CJ, et al. Prevalence and comorbidity of sleep conditions in Australian adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation national survey. Sleep Health. 2018;4(1):13-19.
Appleton, S. L., Gill, T. K., Lang, C. J., Taylor, A. W., McEvoy, R. D., Stocks, N. P., ... Adams, R. J. (2018). Prevalence and comorbidity of sleep conditions in Australian adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation national survey. Sleep Health, 4(1), pp. 13-19. doi:10.1016/j.sleh.2017.10.006.
Appleton SL, et al. Prevalence and Comorbidity of Sleep Conditions in Australian Adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation National Survey. Sleep Health. 2018;4(1):13-19. PubMed PMID: 29332673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and comorbidity of sleep conditions in Australian adults: 2016 Sleep Health Foundation national survey. AU - Appleton,Sarah L, AU - Gill,Tiffany K, AU - Lang,Carol J, AU - Taylor,Anne W, AU - McEvoy,R Douglas, AU - Stocks,Nigel P, AU - González-Chica,David A, AU - Adams,Robert J, Y1 - 2017/12/06/ PY - 2017/05/11/received PY - 2017/10/11/revised PY - 2017/10/20/accepted PY - 2018/1/16/entrez PY - 2018/1/16/pubmed PY - 2018/10/20/medline KW - Comorbidity KW - Epidemiology KW - Insomnia KW - Obstructive sleep apnea KW - Snoring SP - 13 EP - 19 JF - Sleep health JO - Sleep Health VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sleep conditions (obstructive sleep apnea [OSA], insomnia symptoms, simple snoring, and restless legs) and their associated burden of chronic conditions in a community sample. DESIGN: Cross-sectional national adult online survey. SETTING: Community-based sample. PARTICIPANTS: Australian adults ≥18 years, N = 1011. MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional national online survey assessed diagnosed OSA, OSA symptoms, insomnia symptoms, sleep problems, excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale ≥11), and physician-diagnosed health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, reflux disease, lung disease, depression, anxiety/panic disorder, arthritis). Possible undiagnosed OSA was estimated using self-reported frequent loud snoring and witness apneas. International Criteria for Sleep Disorders-3 criteria identified insomnia symptoms. Logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, obesity, and smoking determined correlates of sleep disorders. RESULTS: Comorbid sleep conditions were common, with 56% of participants demonstrating ≥1 condition. Reporting ≥1 mental health condition (depression and/or anxiety) was independently associated with diagnosed OSA (odds ratio [95% confidence interval {CI}]: 6.6 [3.2-13.6]), undiagnosed OSA (3.2 [1.8-5.8]), simple snoring (2.4 [1.2-4.5]), insomnia symptoms (4.3 [2.5-7.3]), and restless legs (1.9 [1.2-3.1]). Diagnosed OSA was significantly associated with ≥1 cardiometabolic condition (2.9 [1.4-6.0]) and arthritis (3.6 [1.8-7.2]). ESS ≥11 was associated with diagnosed (3.1 [1.4-6.8]) and undiagnosed OSA (6.2 [3.4-11.4]), insomnia symptoms (2.6 [1.4-4.9]), and restless legs (2.3 [1.4-4.0]), and these sleep conditions were also significantly associated with ≥2 diagnosed medical problems. CONCLUSION: Strategies to facilitate the diagnosis and management of often comorbid sleep disorders in primary care are required to reduce the significant sleep-related disparities in cardiometabolic and mental health. SN - 2352-7226 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29332673/Prevalence_and_comorbidity_of_sleep_conditions_in_Australian_adults:_2016_Sleep_Health_Foundation_national_survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352-7218(17)30217-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -