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Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults.
J Diet Suppl. 2018 Nov 02; 15(6):860-870.JD

Abstract

To investigate the potential of beta-alanine to increase muscular endurance of elder individuals in specific resistance-training protocols, we randomly assigned 27 participants (60-82 years of age) to a 12-week double-blind intervention using 3.2 g/day beta-alanine or placebo with or without resistance training to determine the effects on anthropometrics, muscular performance, and activities of daily living (ADL). The endurance-based resistance-training program (ERT) was given three times per week and included two sets of 15-25 repetitions on 11 computerized pneumatic machines (alternating upper and lower body) at an intensity of 50% of maximum lifting weight (1RM). Mixed design analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant group × time interactions (p > .05) for any anthropometric or strength measures except 1RM leg press (p = .010). A post hoc analysis revealed significant improvements in 1RM leg press for both the resistance-training groups (p < .001) but no significant between-group difference attributable to beta-alanine. For the 20-repetition chest and leg press tests, no main effects of beta-alanine or group × time interactions for the exercise versus control groups were observed. Pairwise comparisons, however, did reveal significant improvements in peak and average power for both tests and fatigue index for the chest press in resistance-training groups. Although beta-alanine had no effect on any measures, the ERT program did positively affect three performance variables: 1RM, mechanical power, and fatigue patterns during muscular endurance testing. Future research should examine beta-alanine with different dosages and training programs to expand upon our findings using endurance-based resistance training.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a University of Miami , Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences , Coral Gables , FL , USA.a University of Miami , Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences , Coral Gables , FL , USA.a University of Miami , Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences , Coral Gables , FL , USA.a University of Miami , Department of Kinesiology and Sport Sciences , Coral Gables , FL , USA.b University of Miami , Education and Psychological Studies , Coral Gables , FL , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29336621

Citation

Bailey, Christopher H., et al. "Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults." Journal of Dietary Supplements, vol. 15, no. 6, 2018, pp. 860-870.
Bailey CH, Signorile JF, Perry AC, et al. Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults. J Diet Suppl. 2018;15(6):860-870.
Bailey, C. H., Signorile, J. F., Perry, A. C., Jacobs, K. A., & Myers, N. D. (2018). Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults. Journal of Dietary Supplements, 15(6), 860-870. https://doi.org/10.1080/19390211.2017.1406422
Bailey CH, et al. Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults. J Diet Suppl. 2018 Nov 2;15(6):860-870. PubMed PMID: 29336621.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Beta-Alanine Does Not Enhance the Effects of Resistance Training in Older Adults. AU - Bailey,Christopher H, AU - Signorile,Joseph F, AU - Perry,Arlette C, AU - Jacobs,Kevin A, AU - Myers,Nicholas D, Y1 - 2018/01/16/ PY - 2018/1/18/pubmed PY - 2018/11/8/medline PY - 2018/1/17/entrez KW - amino acid supplementation KW - elderly KW - muscular endurance KW - neuromuscular fatigue SP - 860 EP - 870 JF - Journal of dietary supplements JO - J Diet Suppl VL - 15 IS - 6 N2 - To investigate the potential of beta-alanine to increase muscular endurance of elder individuals in specific resistance-training protocols, we randomly assigned 27 participants (60-82 years of age) to a 12-week double-blind intervention using 3.2 g/day beta-alanine or placebo with or without resistance training to determine the effects on anthropometrics, muscular performance, and activities of daily living (ADL). The endurance-based resistance-training program (ERT) was given three times per week and included two sets of 15-25 repetitions on 11 computerized pneumatic machines (alternating upper and lower body) at an intensity of 50% of maximum lifting weight (1RM). Mixed design analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed no significant group × time interactions (p > .05) for any anthropometric or strength measures except 1RM leg press (p = .010). A post hoc analysis revealed significant improvements in 1RM leg press for both the resistance-training groups (p < .001) but no significant between-group difference attributable to beta-alanine. For the 20-repetition chest and leg press tests, no main effects of beta-alanine or group × time interactions for the exercise versus control groups were observed. Pairwise comparisons, however, did reveal significant improvements in peak and average power for both tests and fatigue index for the chest press in resistance-training groups. Although beta-alanine had no effect on any measures, the ERT program did positively affect three performance variables: 1RM, mechanical power, and fatigue patterns during muscular endurance testing. Future research should examine beta-alanine with different dosages and training programs to expand upon our findings using endurance-based resistance training. SN - 1939-022X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29336621/Beta_Alanine_Does_Not_Enhance_the_Effects_of_Resistance_Training_in_Older_Adults_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19390211.2017.1406422 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -