Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Obstetric complications after frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: results from a randomized trial.
Fertil Steril. 2018 02; 109(2):324-329.FS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effect of frozen embryo transfer on maternal and neonatal complications of singleton and twin pregnancies compared with fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN

A secondary analysis of a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing live birth after frozen vs. fresh embryo transfer (FreFro-PCOS).

SETTING

Reproductive medicine centers.

PATIENT(S)

A total of 1,508 patients with a diagnosis of PCOS who were undergoing IVF were enrolled.

INTERVENTION(S)

On day of oocyte retrieval, eligible patients were randomized to the fresh or frozen embryo transfer groups. Up to two embryos were transferred in both groups. All pregnancies were followed up until delivery.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S)

Gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age, and large for gestational age.

RESULT(S)

The risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, and small for gestational age were comparable between the frozen and fresh embryo transfer groups in both singleton and twin births. However, singleton infants born after frozen embryo transfer were more likely to be large for gestational age (25.2% vs. 17.5%; relative risk 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.07, P=.044) than those born after fresh embryo transfer. Twin pregnancy after frozen embryo transfer had a higher risk of pre-eclampsia (12.0% vs. 2.8%; relative risk 4.31, 95% confidence interval 1.27-14.58, P=.009) than those after fresh embryo transfer.

CONCLUSION(S)

In women with PCOS, frozen embryo transfer resulted in an increased risk of large for gestational age in singleton pregnancy and a higher risk of pre-eclampsia in twin pregnancy.

CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER

NCT01841528.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Reproductive Medicine, Maternal and Child Health Hospital in Guangxi, Nanning, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China; The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology of Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan, People's Republic of China.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China; The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology of Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China; The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology of Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China; The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology of Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China.Center for Reproductive Medicine, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, People's Republic of China; The Key Laboratory of Reproductive Endocrinology of Ministry of Education, and National Research Center for Assisted Reproductive Technology and Reproductive Genetics, Jinan, People's Republic of China; Center for Reproductive Medicine, Ren Ji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; Shanghai Key Laboratory of Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. Electronic address: chenzijiang@hotmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29338857

Citation

Zhang, Bo, et al. "Obstetric Complications After Frozen Versus Fresh Embryo Transfer in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Results From a Randomized Trial." Fertility and Sterility, vol. 109, no. 2, 2018, pp. 324-329.
Zhang B, Wei D, Legro RS, et al. Obstetric complications after frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: results from a randomized trial. Fertil Steril. 2018;109(2):324-329.
Zhang, B., Wei, D., Legro, R. S., Shi, Y., Li, J., Zhang, L., Hong, Y., Sun, G., Zhang, T., Li, W., & Chen, Z. J. (2018). Obstetric complications after frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: results from a randomized trial. Fertility and Sterility, 109(2), 324-329. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2017.10.020
Zhang B, et al. Obstetric Complications After Frozen Versus Fresh Embryo Transfer in Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Results From a Randomized Trial. Fertil Steril. 2018;109(2):324-329. PubMed PMID: 29338857.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obstetric complications after frozen versus fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: results from a randomized trial. AU - Zhang,Bo, AU - Wei,Daimin, AU - Legro,Richard S, AU - Shi,Yuhua, AU - Li,Jing, AU - Zhang,Lin, AU - Hong,Yan, AU - Sun,Gang, AU - Zhang,Ting, AU - Li,Weiping, AU - Chen,Zi-Jiang, Y1 - 2018/01/17/ PY - 2017/08/04/received PY - 2017/09/27/revised PY - 2017/10/12/accepted PY - 2018/1/18/pubmed PY - 2018/10/30/medline PY - 2018/1/18/entrez KW - Frozen embryo transfer KW - large for gestational age KW - polycystic ovary syndrome KW - pre-eclampsia KW - preterm birth SP - 324 EP - 329 JF - Fertility and sterility JO - Fertil. Steril. VL - 109 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of frozen embryo transfer on maternal and neonatal complications of singleton and twin pregnancies compared with fresh embryo transfer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). DESIGN: A secondary analysis of a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing live birth after frozen vs. fresh embryo transfer (FreFro-PCOS). SETTING: Reproductive medicine centers. PATIENT(S): A total of 1,508 patients with a diagnosis of PCOS who were undergoing IVF were enrolled. INTERVENTION(S): On day of oocyte retrieval, eligible patients were randomized to the fresh or frozen embryo transfer groups. Up to two embryos were transferred in both groups. All pregnancies were followed up until delivery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Gestational diabetes mellitus, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, small for gestational age, and large for gestational age. RESULT(S): The risks of gestational diabetes mellitus, preterm birth, and small for gestational age were comparable between the frozen and fresh embryo transfer groups in both singleton and twin births. However, singleton infants born after frozen embryo transfer were more likely to be large for gestational age (25.2% vs. 17.5%; relative risk 1.44, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.07, P=.044) than those born after fresh embryo transfer. Twin pregnancy after frozen embryo transfer had a higher risk of pre-eclampsia (12.0% vs. 2.8%; relative risk 4.31, 95% confidence interval 1.27-14.58, P=.009) than those after fresh embryo transfer. CONCLUSION(S): In women with PCOS, frozen embryo transfer resulted in an increased risk of large for gestational age in singleton pregnancy and a higher risk of pre-eclampsia in twin pregnancy. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01841528. SN - 1556-5653 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29338857/Obstetric_complications_after_frozen_versus_fresh_embryo_transfer_in_women_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome:_results_from_a_randomized_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0015-0282(17)31990-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -