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Congenital blindness limits allocentric to egocentric switching ability.
Exp Brain Res. 2018 03; 236(3):813-820.EB

Abstract

Many everyday spatial activities require the cooperation or switching between egocentric (subject-to-object) and allocentric (object-to-object) spatial representations. The literature on blind people has reported that the lack of vision (congenital blindness) may limit the capacity to represent allocentric spatial information. However, research has mainly focused on the selective involvement of egocentric or allocentric representations, not the switching between them. Here we investigated the effect of visual deprivation on the ability to switch between spatial frames of reference. To this aim, congenitally blind (long-term visual deprivation), blindfolded sighted (temporary visual deprivation) and sighted (full visual availability) participants were compared on the Ego-Allo switching task. This task assessed the capacity to verbally judge the relative distances between memorized stimuli in switching (from egocentric-to-allocentric: Ego-Allo; from allocentric-to-egocentric: Allo-Ego) and non-switching (only-egocentric: Ego-Ego; only-allocentric: Allo-Allo) conditions. Results showed a difficulty in congenitally blind participants when switching from allocentric to egocentric representations, not when the first anchor point was egocentric. In line with previous results, a deficit in processing allocentric representations in non-switching conditions also emerged. These findings suggest that the allocentric deficit in congenital blindness may determine a difficulty in simultaneously maintaining and combining different spatial representations. This deficit alters the capacity to switch between reference frames specifically when the first anchor point is external and not body-centered.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, CS-IVR, Department of Psychology, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta, Italy. gennaro.ruggiero@unicampania.it.Cognitive and Affective Sciences Laboratory (SCALab), UMR CNRS 9193, University of Lille-3, Lille, France.Laboratory of Cognitive Science and Immersive Virtual Reality, CS-IVR, Department of Psychology, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Viale Ellittico, 31, 81100, Caserta, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29340716

Citation

Ruggiero, Gennaro, et al. "Congenital Blindness Limits Allocentric to Egocentric Switching Ability." Experimental Brain Research, vol. 236, no. 3, 2018, pp. 813-820.
Ruggiero G, Ruotolo F, Iachini T. Congenital blindness limits allocentric to egocentric switching ability. Exp Brain Res. 2018;236(3):813-820.
Ruggiero, G., Ruotolo, F., & Iachini, T. (2018). Congenital blindness limits allocentric to egocentric switching ability. Experimental Brain Research, 236(3), 813-820. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5176-8
Ruggiero G, Ruotolo F, Iachini T. Congenital Blindness Limits Allocentric to Egocentric Switching Ability. Exp Brain Res. 2018;236(3):813-820. PubMed PMID: 29340716.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Congenital blindness limits allocentric to egocentric switching ability. AU - Ruggiero,Gennaro, AU - Ruotolo,Francesco, AU - Iachini,Tina, Y1 - 2018/01/16/ PY - 2017/05/08/received PY - 2018/01/09/accepted PY - 2018/1/18/pubmed PY - 2019/1/30/medline PY - 2018/1/18/entrez KW - Blindfolded sighted KW - Congenitally blindness KW - Egocentric–allocentric reference frames KW - Resource demanding process KW - Spatial memory KW - Switching ability SP - 813 EP - 820 JF - Experimental brain research JO - Exp Brain Res VL - 236 IS - 3 N2 - Many everyday spatial activities require the cooperation or switching between egocentric (subject-to-object) and allocentric (object-to-object) spatial representations. The literature on blind people has reported that the lack of vision (congenital blindness) may limit the capacity to represent allocentric spatial information. However, research has mainly focused on the selective involvement of egocentric or allocentric representations, not the switching between them. Here we investigated the effect of visual deprivation on the ability to switch between spatial frames of reference. To this aim, congenitally blind (long-term visual deprivation), blindfolded sighted (temporary visual deprivation) and sighted (full visual availability) participants were compared on the Ego-Allo switching task. This task assessed the capacity to verbally judge the relative distances between memorized stimuli in switching (from egocentric-to-allocentric: Ego-Allo; from allocentric-to-egocentric: Allo-Ego) and non-switching (only-egocentric: Ego-Ego; only-allocentric: Allo-Allo) conditions. Results showed a difficulty in congenitally blind participants when switching from allocentric to egocentric representations, not when the first anchor point was egocentric. In line with previous results, a deficit in processing allocentric representations in non-switching conditions also emerged. These findings suggest that the allocentric deficit in congenital blindness may determine a difficulty in simultaneously maintaining and combining different spatial representations. This deficit alters the capacity to switch between reference frames specifically when the first anchor point is external and not body-centered. SN - 1432-1106 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29340716/Congenital_blindness_limits_allocentric_to_egocentric_switching_ability_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00221-018-5176-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -