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Cue reactivity, habituation, and eating in the absence of hunger in children with loss of control eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
Int J Eat Disord. 2018 03; 51(3):223-232.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Childhood loss of control (LOC) eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are highly comorbid conditions and present with disordered eating behaviors, such as overeating. This study sought to delineate shared and specific abnormalities in physiological, cognitive-motivational, and behavioral components of food-specific impulsivity in children with LOC eating and ADHD. Specifically, children's reactivity and habituation to food and eating in the absence of hunger were examined.

METHODS

Within this community-based study, four groups of 8-13-year-old children with LOC eating (n = 24), ADHD (n = 32), comorbid LOC eating/ADHD (n = 9), and matched controls (n = 34) received a standard laboratory test meal to establish satiety and were then exposed to their favorite snack food in a cue exposure/reactivity trial, while salivation and desire to eat were repeatedly assessed. Subsequently, they were offered a variety of snack foods ad libitum.

RESULTS

Children with LOC eating, ADHD, and LOC/ADHD did not differ from controls in salivary reactivity and habituation to food cues. Children with LOC eating and ADHD showed greater cue reactivity of the desire to eat than controls, but groups did not differ in its longer-term increments. At free access, only children with LOC/ADHD consumed significantly more energy than controls. Longer-term increments of desire to eat predicted greater energy intake beyond LOC/ADHD group status.

DISCUSSION

Desire to eat among children with comorbid LOC eating and ADHD was associated with overeating in the absence of hunger, which may contribute to excess weight gain. Delineation of the specific features of childhood LOC eating versus ADHD warrants further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany. Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany. Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics I, Martin Luther University of Halle, Halle, Germany.Department of Psychology, University of Fribourg, Fribourg, Switzerland.Integrated Research and Treatment Center AdiposityDiseases, Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University of Leipzig Medical Center, Leipzig, Germany.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29341214

Citation

Hilbert, Anja, et al. "Cue Reactivity, Habituation, and Eating in the Absence of Hunger in Children With Loss of Control Eating and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 51, no. 3, 2018, pp. 223-232.
Hilbert A, Kurz S, Dremmel D, et al. Cue reactivity, habituation, and eating in the absence of hunger in children with loss of control eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2018;51(3):223-232.
Hilbert, A., Kurz, S., Dremmel, D., Weihrauch Blüher, S., Munsch, S., & Schmidt, R. (2018). Cue reactivity, habituation, and eating in the absence of hunger in children with loss of control eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 51(3), 223-232. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22821
Hilbert A, et al. Cue Reactivity, Habituation, and Eating in the Absence of Hunger in Children With Loss of Control Eating and Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. Int J Eat Disord. 2018;51(3):223-232. PubMed PMID: 29341214.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cue reactivity, habituation, and eating in the absence of hunger in children with loss of control eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. AU - Hilbert,Anja, AU - Kurz,Susanne, AU - Dremmel,Daniela, AU - Weihrauch Blüher,Susann, AU - Munsch,Simone, AU - Schmidt,Ricarda, Y1 - 2018/01/17/ PY - 2017/08/14/received PY - 2017/12/18/revised PY - 2017/12/19/accepted PY - 2018/1/18/pubmed PY - 2018/10/23/medline PY - 2018/1/18/entrez KW - attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity KW - binge-eating disorder KW - craving KW - cue KW - eating KW - meal KW - salivation SP - 223 EP - 232 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 51 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Childhood loss of control (LOC) eating and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are highly comorbid conditions and present with disordered eating behaviors, such as overeating. This study sought to delineate shared and specific abnormalities in physiological, cognitive-motivational, and behavioral components of food-specific impulsivity in children with LOC eating and ADHD. Specifically, children's reactivity and habituation to food and eating in the absence of hunger were examined. METHODS: Within this community-based study, four groups of 8-13-year-old children with LOC eating (n = 24), ADHD (n = 32), comorbid LOC eating/ADHD (n = 9), and matched controls (n = 34) received a standard laboratory test meal to establish satiety and were then exposed to their favorite snack food in a cue exposure/reactivity trial, while salivation and desire to eat were repeatedly assessed. Subsequently, they were offered a variety of snack foods ad libitum. RESULTS: Children with LOC eating, ADHD, and LOC/ADHD did not differ from controls in salivary reactivity and habituation to food cues. Children with LOC eating and ADHD showed greater cue reactivity of the desire to eat than controls, but groups did not differ in its longer-term increments. At free access, only children with LOC/ADHD consumed significantly more energy than controls. Longer-term increments of desire to eat predicted greater energy intake beyond LOC/ADHD group status. DISCUSSION: Desire to eat among children with comorbid LOC eating and ADHD was associated with overeating in the absence of hunger, which may contribute to excess weight gain. Delineation of the specific features of childhood LOC eating versus ADHD warrants further study. SN - 1098-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29341214/Cue_reactivity_habituation_and_eating_in_the_absence_of_hunger_in_children_with_loss_of_control_eating_and_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22821 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -