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Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Jan 19; 67(2):53-59.MM

Abstract

The U.S. Surgeon General has concluded that the burden of death and disease from tobacco use in the United States is overwhelmingly caused by cigarettes and other combusted tobacco products (1). Cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S. adults, and about 480,000 U.S. deaths per year are caused by cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure (1). To assess progress toward the Healthy People 2020 target of reducing the proportion of U.S. adults aged ≥18 years who smoke cigarettes to ≤12.0% (objective TU-1.1),* CDC analyzed data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). In 2016, the prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults was 15.5%, which was a significant decline from 2005 (20.9%); however, no significant change has occurred since 2015 (15.1%). In 2016, the prevalence of cigarette smoking was higher among adults who were male, aged 25-64 years, American Indian/Alaska Native or multiracial, had a General Education Development (GED) certificate, lived below the federal poverty level, lived in the Midwest or South, were uninsured or insured through Medicaid, had a disability/limitation, were lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB), or had serious psychological distress. During 2005-2016, the percentage of ever smokers who quit smoking increased from 50.8% to 59.0%. Proven population-based interventions are critical to reducing the health and economic burden of smoking-related diseases among U.S. adults, particularly among subpopulations with the highest smoking prevalences (1,2).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29346338

Citation

Jamal, Ahmed, et al. "Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016." MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol. 67, no. 2, 2018, pp. 53-59.
Jamal A, Phillips E, Gentzke AS, et al. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018;67(2):53-59.
Jamal, A., Phillips, E., Gentzke, A. S., Homa, D. M., Babb, S. D., King, B. A., & Neff, L. J. (2018). Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016. MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 67(2), 53-59. https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6702a1
Jamal A, et al. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2018 Jan 19;67(2):53-59. PubMed PMID: 29346338.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current Cigarette Smoking Among Adults - United States, 2016. AU - Jamal,Ahmed, AU - Phillips,Elyse, AU - Gentzke,Andrea S, AU - Homa,David M, AU - Babb,Stephen D, AU - King,Brian A, AU - Neff,Linda J, Y1 - 2018/01/19/ PY - 2018/1/19/entrez PY - 2018/1/19/pubmed PY - 2018/1/20/medline SP - 53 EP - 59 JF - MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report JO - MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep VL - 67 IS - 2 N2 - The U.S. Surgeon General has concluded that the burden of death and disease from tobacco use in the United States is overwhelmingly caused by cigarettes and other combusted tobacco products (1). Cigarettes are the most commonly used tobacco product among U.S. adults, and about 480,000 U.S. deaths per year are caused by cigarette smoking and secondhand smoke exposure (1). To assess progress toward the Healthy People 2020 target of reducing the proportion of U.S. adults aged ≥18 years who smoke cigarettes to ≤12.0% (objective TU-1.1),* CDC analyzed data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). In 2016, the prevalence of current cigarette smoking among adults was 15.5%, which was a significant decline from 2005 (20.9%); however, no significant change has occurred since 2015 (15.1%). In 2016, the prevalence of cigarette smoking was higher among adults who were male, aged 25-64 years, American Indian/Alaska Native or multiracial, had a General Education Development (GED) certificate, lived below the federal poverty level, lived in the Midwest or South, were uninsured or insured through Medicaid, had a disability/limitation, were lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB), or had serious psychological distress. During 2005-2016, the percentage of ever smokers who quit smoking increased from 50.8% to 59.0%. Proven population-based interventions are critical to reducing the health and economic burden of smoking-related diseases among U.S. adults, particularly among subpopulations with the highest smoking prevalences (1,2). SN - 1545-861X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29346338/Current_Cigarette_Smoking_Among_Adults___United_States_2016_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.mm6702a1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -