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Measuring cochlear blood flow by laser Doppler spectroscopy.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1985 Dec; 93(6):786-93.OH

Abstract

Cochlear blood flow (CBF) was studied with a commercially available laser Doppler system in 20 guinea pigs. The cochlea was exposed to permit placement of the laser Doppler probe over the intact lateral wall of the basal turn. Ketamine and xylazine were used for anesthesia, and blood pressure was monitored from the femoral artery. In some cases, skin blood flow was monitored with a second laser Doppler system, and cardiac output was monitored with an ultrasonic Doppler system placed over the right brachiocephalic artery. We found that the laser Doppler signal is composed primarily of blood flow supplied by the internal auditory artery. Local pressure on the contents of the internal auditory canal after occipital craniotomy was found to reduce CBF to 15% of its original value in a reversible fashion. There was no change in CBF after bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. There appears to be a mechanism governing CBF that stabilizes its value in the face of changes in blood pressure and cardiac output. This is similar to the vascular behavior of the central nervous system. Through the use of positive airway pressure and blood removal at different rates, cardiac output could be depressed to varying degrees. The magnitude of decrease in CBF was clearly related to the rate at which cardiac output and blood pressure dropped. This was confirmed when intravenous phenylephrine was given in sequential and increasing doses. CBF increased as blood viscosity decreased, as expected according to the vascular behavior of the central nervous system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2935771

Citation

Short, S O., et al. "Measuring Cochlear Blood Flow By Laser Doppler Spectroscopy." Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 93, no. 6, 1985, pp. 786-93.
Short SO, Goodwin PC, Kaplan JN, et al. Measuring cochlear blood flow by laser Doppler spectroscopy. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1985;93(6):786-93.
Short, S. O., Goodwin, P. C., Kaplan, J. N., & Miller, J. M. (1985). Measuring cochlear blood flow by laser Doppler spectroscopy. Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 93(6), 786-93.
Short SO, et al. Measuring Cochlear Blood Flow By Laser Doppler Spectroscopy. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 1985;93(6):786-93. PubMed PMID: 2935771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Measuring cochlear blood flow by laser Doppler spectroscopy. AU - Short,S O, AU - Goodwin,P C, AU - Kaplan,J N, AU - Miller,J M, PY - 1985/12/1/pubmed PY - 1985/12/1/medline PY - 1985/12/1/entrez SP - 786 EP - 93 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 93 IS - 6 N2 - Cochlear blood flow (CBF) was studied with a commercially available laser Doppler system in 20 guinea pigs. The cochlea was exposed to permit placement of the laser Doppler probe over the intact lateral wall of the basal turn. Ketamine and xylazine were used for anesthesia, and blood pressure was monitored from the femoral artery. In some cases, skin blood flow was monitored with a second laser Doppler system, and cardiac output was monitored with an ultrasonic Doppler system placed over the right brachiocephalic artery. We found that the laser Doppler signal is composed primarily of blood flow supplied by the internal auditory artery. Local pressure on the contents of the internal auditory canal after occipital craniotomy was found to reduce CBF to 15% of its original value in a reversible fashion. There was no change in CBF after bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries. There appears to be a mechanism governing CBF that stabilizes its value in the face of changes in blood pressure and cardiac output. This is similar to the vascular behavior of the central nervous system. Through the use of positive airway pressure and blood removal at different rates, cardiac output could be depressed to varying degrees. The magnitude of decrease in CBF was clearly related to the rate at which cardiac output and blood pressure dropped. This was confirmed when intravenous phenylephrine was given in sequential and increasing doses. CBF increased as blood viscosity decreased, as expected according to the vascular behavior of the central nervous system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) SN - 0194-5998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2935771/Measuring_cochlear_blood_flow_by_laser_Doppler_spectroscopy_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/019459988509300617?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -