Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dairy product consumption may affect the risk of hip fracture, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. The primary aim of our meta-analysis was to examine and quantify the potential association of dairy product consumption with risk of hip fracture.

METHODS

We searched the databases of PubMed and EMBASE for relevant articles from their inception through April 17, 2017. The final analysis included 10 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled risk. Subgroup and dose-response analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between the consumption of milk and the risk of hip fracture.

RESULTS

After pooling the data from the included studies, the summary relative risk (RR) for hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.74-1.12), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.66-0.86), 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0. 77), 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93-1.12) for milk, yogurt, cheese, and total dairy products in cohort studies, respectively. Higher milk consumption [Odds ratio (OR), 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0. 91] was associated with lower risk of hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption in case-control studies. After quantifying the specific dose of milk, the summary RR/OR for an increased milk consumption of 200 g/day was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.94-1.07), and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.64-1.24) with significant heterogeneity for cohort and case-control studies, respectively; There was a nonlinear association between milk consumption and hip fracture risk in cohort, and case-control studies.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that consumption of yogurt and cheese was associated with lower risk of hip fracture in cohort studies. However, the consumption of total dairy products and cream was not significantly associated with the risk of hip fracture. There was insufficient evidence to deduce the association between milk consumption and risk of hip fracture. A lower threshold of 200 g/day milk intake may have beneficial effects, whereas the effects of a higher threshold of milk intake are unclear.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China.

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China.

    ,

    Department of Nutrition, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China.

    ,

    Department of Orthopedics, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China.

    ,

    Health Examination Centre, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China.

    Health Examination Centre, the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, No. 23 Pingjiang Road, Tianjin, 300211, China. majie_tjykdxdeyy@126.com.

    Source

    BMC public health 18:1 2018 01 22 pg 165

    MeSH

    Dairy Products
    Diet
    Hip Fractures
    Humans
    Risk

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29357845

    Citation

    Bian, Shanshan, et al. "Dairy Product Consumption and Risk of Hip Fracture: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." BMC Public Health, vol. 18, no. 1, 2018, p. 165.
    Bian S, Hu J, Zhang K, et al. Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2018;18(1):165.
    Bian, S., Hu, J., Zhang, K., Wang, Y., Yu, M., & Ma, J. (2018). Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Public Health, 18(1), p. 165. doi:10.1186/s12889-018-5041-5.
    Bian S, et al. Dairy Product Consumption and Risk of Hip Fracture: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. BMC Public Health. 2018 01 22;18(1):165. PubMed PMID: 29357845.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy product consumption and risk of hip fracture: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Bian,Shanshan, AU - Hu,Jingmin, AU - Zhang,Kai, AU - Wang,Yunguo, AU - Yu,Miaohui, AU - Ma,Jie, Y1 - 2018/01/22/ PY - 2017/07/20/received PY - 2018/01/05/accepted PY - 2018/1/24/entrez PY - 2018/1/24/pubmed PY - 2018/5/11/medline KW - Case-control study KW - Cohort study KW - Dairy products KW - Diet KW - Hip fracture KW - Meta-analysis KW - Milk consumption SP - 165 EP - 165 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dairy product consumption may affect the risk of hip fracture, but previous studies have reported inconsistent findings. The primary aim of our meta-analysis was to examine and quantify the potential association of dairy product consumption with risk of hip fracture. METHODS: We searched the databases of PubMed and EMBASE for relevant articles from their inception through April 17, 2017. The final analysis included 10 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Random-effects models were used to estimate the pooled risk. Subgroup and dose-response analyses were conducted to explore the relationships between the consumption of milk and the risk of hip fracture. RESULTS: After pooling the data from the included studies, the summary relative risk (RR) for hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption were 0.91 (95% CI: 0.74-1.12), 0.75 (95% CI: 0.66-0.86), 0.68 (95% CI: 0.61-0. 77), 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93-1.12) for milk, yogurt, cheese, and total dairy products in cohort studies, respectively. Higher milk consumption [Odds ratio (OR), 0.71, 95% CI: 0.55-0. 91] was associated with lower risk of hip fracture for highest versus lowest consumption in case-control studies. After quantifying the specific dose of milk, the summary RR/OR for an increased milk consumption of 200 g/day was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.94-1.07), and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.64-1.24) with significant heterogeneity for cohort and case-control studies, respectively; There was a nonlinear association between milk consumption and hip fracture risk in cohort, and case-control studies. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that consumption of yogurt and cheese was associated with lower risk of hip fracture in cohort studies. However, the consumption of total dairy products and cream was not significantly associated with the risk of hip fracture. There was insufficient evidence to deduce the association between milk consumption and risk of hip fracture. A lower threshold of 200 g/day milk intake may have beneficial effects, whereas the effects of a higher threshold of milk intake are unclear. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29357845/Dairy_product_consumption_and_risk_of_hip_fracture:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-5041-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -