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The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically.
Subst Use Misuse. 2018 08 24; 53(10):1688-1699.SU

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Nonmedical prescription opioid (NMPO) use is a problem among young adults, yet young NMPO users are a diverse population that has been challenging to engage in overdose prevention and harm reduction programs.

OBJECTIVES

This study compared the effectiveness and characteristics of persons recruited through two different sampling strategies to inform research and intervention efforts with young adult NMPO users.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the Rhode Island Young Adult Prescription Drug Study (RAPiDS), which enrolled persons aged 18 to 29 who reported past 30-day NMPO use. We compared the characteristics of two samples recruited simultaneously between February 2015 and February 2016. One sample was recruited using field-based strategies (e.g., respondent-driven sampling, transit ads), and a second from internet sources (e.g., online classifieds).

RESULTS

Among 198 eligible participants, the median age was 25 (IQR: 22, 27), 130 (65.7%) were male, 123 (63.1%) were white, and 150 (78.1%) resided in urban areas. A total of 79 (39.9%) were recruited using field-based strategies and 119 (60.1%) were recruited from internet sources. Internet-recruited persons were younger (median = 24 [IQR: 21, 27] vs. 26 [IQR: 23, 28] years) and more likely to reside in rural areas (16.2% vs. 5.3%), although this finding was marginally significant. Field-recruited participants were more likely to have been homeless (36.7% vs. 17.7%), have been incarcerated (39.7% vs. 21.8%), and engage in daily NMPO use (34.6% vs. 14.5%).

CONCLUSIONS

Multipronged outreach methods are needed to engage the full spectrum of young adult NMPO users in prevention and harm reduction efforts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Brown University School of Public Health , Department of Epidemiology , Providence , Rhode Island , USA.a Brown University School of Public Health , Department of Epidemiology , Providence , Rhode Island , USA. b Department of Emergency Medicine , Boston University School of Medicine , Boston , Massachusetts , USA. c Department of Emergency Medicine , Rhode Island Hospital, The Warren Alpert School of Medicine of Brown University, Providence , Rhode Island , USA.a Brown University School of Public Health , Department of Epidemiology , Providence , Rhode Island , USA.a Brown University School of Public Health , Department of Epidemiology , Providence , Rhode Island , USA.d Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics , Boston University School of Medicine , Boston , Massachusetts , USA. e Department of Pediatrics , Boston Medical Center , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.a Brown University School of Public Health , Department of Epidemiology , Providence , Rhode Island , USA. f Department of Quantitative Health Sciences & Center for Health Policy and Research , University of Massachusetts Medical School , Worcester , Massachusetts , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29364768

Citation

Marshall, Brandon D L., et al. "The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically." Substance Use & Misuse, vol. 53, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1688-1699.
Marshall BDL, Green TC, Elston B, et al. The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically. Subst Use Misuse. 2018;53(10):1688-1699.
Marshall, B. D. L., Green, T. C., Elston, B., Yedinak, J. L., Hadland, S. E., & Clark, M. A. (2018). The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically. Substance Use & Misuse, 53(10), 1688-1699. https://doi.org/10.1080/10826084.2018.1425725
Marshall BDL, et al. The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically. Subst Use Misuse. 2018 08 24;53(10):1688-1699. PubMed PMID: 29364768.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Effectiveness of Internet- and Field-Based Methods to Recruit Young Adults Who Use Prescription Opioids Nonmedically. AU - Marshall,Brandon D L, AU - Green,Traci C, AU - Elston,Beth, AU - Yedinak,Jesse L, AU - Hadland,Scott E, AU - Clark,Melissa A, Y1 - 2018/01/24/ PY - 2018/1/25/pubmed PY - 2019/3/2/medline PY - 2018/1/25/entrez KW - Youth KW - opioid-related disorders KW - prescription opioids KW - sampling KW - young adults SP - 1688 EP - 1699 JF - Substance use & misuse JO - Subst Use Misuse VL - 53 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Nonmedical prescription opioid (NMPO) use is a problem among young adults, yet young NMPO users are a diverse population that has been challenging to engage in overdose prevention and harm reduction programs. OBJECTIVES: This study compared the effectiveness and characteristics of persons recruited through two different sampling strategies to inform research and intervention efforts with young adult NMPO users. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Rhode Island Young Adult Prescription Drug Study (RAPiDS), which enrolled persons aged 18 to 29 who reported past 30-day NMPO use. We compared the characteristics of two samples recruited simultaneously between February 2015 and February 2016. One sample was recruited using field-based strategies (e.g., respondent-driven sampling, transit ads), and a second from internet sources (e.g., online classifieds). RESULTS: Among 198 eligible participants, the median age was 25 (IQR: 22, 27), 130 (65.7%) were male, 123 (63.1%) were white, and 150 (78.1%) resided in urban areas. A total of 79 (39.9%) were recruited using field-based strategies and 119 (60.1%) were recruited from internet sources. Internet-recruited persons were younger (median = 24 [IQR: 21, 27] vs. 26 [IQR: 23, 28] years) and more likely to reside in rural areas (16.2% vs. 5.3%), although this finding was marginally significant. Field-recruited participants were more likely to have been homeless (36.7% vs. 17.7%), have been incarcerated (39.7% vs. 21.8%), and engage in daily NMPO use (34.6% vs. 14.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Multipronged outreach methods are needed to engage the full spectrum of young adult NMPO users in prevention and harm reduction efforts. SN - 1532-2491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29364768/The_Effectiveness_of_Internet__and_Field_Based_Methods_to_Recruit_Young_Adults_Who_Use_Prescription_Opioids_Nonmedically_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10826084.2018.1425725 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -