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Rotavirus strain distribution in Ghana pre- and post- rotavirus vaccine introduction.
Vaccine. 2018 11 12; 36(47):7238-7242.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Ghana introduced the monovalent rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix) into its national paediatric vaccination programme in May2012. Vaccine introduction was initiated nationwide and achieved >85% coverage within a few months. Rotavirus strain distribution pre- and post-RV vaccine introduction is reported.

METHODS

Stool samples were collected from diarrhoeic children <5 years of age hospitalized between 2009 and 2016 at sentinel sites across Ghana and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus strains were characterized by RT-PCR and sequencing.

RESULTS

A total of 1363 rotavirus EIA-positive samples were subjected to molecular characterization. These were made up of 823 (60.4%) and 540 (39.6%) samples from the pre- and post-vaccine periods respectively. Rotavirus VP7 genotypes G1, G2 and G3, and VP4 genotypes P[6] and P[8] constituted more than 65% of circulating G and P types in the pre-vaccine period. The common strains detected were G1P[8] (20%), G3P[6] (9.2%) and G2P[6] (4.9%). During the post-vaccine period, G12, G1 and G10 genotypes, constituted more than 65% of the VP7 genotypes whilst P[6] and P[8] made up more than 75% of the VP4 genotypes. The predominant circulating strains were G12P[8] (26%), G10P[6] (10%) G3P[6] (8.1%) and G1P[8] (8.0%). We also observed the emergence of the unusual rotavirus strain G9P[4] during this period.

CONCLUSION

Rotavirus G1P[8], the major strain in circulation during the pre-vaccination era, was replaced by G12P[8] as the most predominant strain after vaccine introduction. This strain replacement could be temporary and unrelated to vaccine introduction since an increase in G12 was observed in countries yet to introduce the rotavirus vaccine in West Africa. A continuous surveillance programme in the post-vaccine era is necessary for the monitoring of circulating rotavirus strains and the detection of unusual/emerging genotypes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana.School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Ghana, Ghana.School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.School of Medical Sciences, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana.School of Biomedical and Allied Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Ghana.World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa (WHO/AFRO), Brazzaville, Congo.WHO Country Office, Accra, Ghana.School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.School of Public Health, University of Health and Allied Sciences, Ho, Ghana.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Dept. of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, USA.Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Ghana, Legon, Ghana. Electronic address: garmah@noguchi.ug.edu.gh.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29371014

Citation

Lartey, Belinda L., et al. "Rotavirus Strain Distribution in Ghana Pre- and Post- Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction." Vaccine, vol. 36, no. 47, 2018, pp. 7238-7242.
Lartey BL, Damanka S, Dennis FE, et al. Rotavirus strain distribution in Ghana pre- and post- rotavirus vaccine introduction. Vaccine. 2018;36(47):7238-7242.
Lartey, B. L., Damanka, S., Dennis, F. E., Enweronu-Laryea, C. C., Addo-Yobo, E., Ansong, D., Kwarteng-Owusu, S., Sagoe, K. W., Mwenda, J. M., Diamenu, S. K., Narh, C., Binka, F., Parashar, U., Lopman, B., & Armah, G. E. (2018). Rotavirus strain distribution in Ghana pre- and post- rotavirus vaccine introduction. Vaccine, 36(47), 7238-7242. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.01.010
Lartey BL, et al. Rotavirus Strain Distribution in Ghana Pre- and Post- Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction. Vaccine. 2018 11 12;36(47):7238-7242. PubMed PMID: 29371014.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rotavirus strain distribution in Ghana pre- and post- rotavirus vaccine introduction. AU - Lartey,Belinda L, AU - Damanka,Susan, AU - Dennis,Francis Ekow, AU - Enweronu-Laryea,Christabel C, AU - Addo-Yobo,Emmanuel, AU - Ansong,Daniel, AU - Kwarteng-Owusu,Sandra, AU - Sagoe,Kwamena W, AU - Mwenda,Jason M, AU - Diamenu,Stanley K, AU - Narh,Clement, AU - Binka,Fred, AU - Parashar,Umesh, AU - Lopman,Ben, AU - Armah,George E, Y1 - 2018/01/20/ PY - 2017/10/09/received PY - 2017/12/19/revised PY - 2018/01/04/accepted PY - 2018/1/27/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2018/1/27/entrez KW - Ghana KW - Monovalent rotavirus vaccine KW - Strains SP - 7238 EP - 7242 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 36 IS - 47 N2 - BACKGROUND: Ghana introduced the monovalent rotavirus vaccine (Rotarix) into its national paediatric vaccination programme in May2012. Vaccine introduction was initiated nationwide and achieved >85% coverage within a few months. Rotavirus strain distribution pre- and post-RV vaccine introduction is reported. METHODS: Stool samples were collected from diarrhoeic children <5 years of age hospitalized between 2009 and 2016 at sentinel sites across Ghana and analyzed for the presence of group A rotavirus by enzyme immunoassay. Rotavirus strains were characterized by RT-PCR and sequencing. RESULTS: A total of 1363 rotavirus EIA-positive samples were subjected to molecular characterization. These were made up of 823 (60.4%) and 540 (39.6%) samples from the pre- and post-vaccine periods respectively. Rotavirus VP7 genotypes G1, G2 and G3, and VP4 genotypes P[6] and P[8] constituted more than 65% of circulating G and P types in the pre-vaccine period. The common strains detected were G1P[8] (20%), G3P[6] (9.2%) and G2P[6] (4.9%). During the post-vaccine period, G12, G1 and G10 genotypes, constituted more than 65% of the VP7 genotypes whilst P[6] and P[8] made up more than 75% of the VP4 genotypes. The predominant circulating strains were G12P[8] (26%), G10P[6] (10%) G3P[6] (8.1%) and G1P[8] (8.0%). We also observed the emergence of the unusual rotavirus strain G9P[4] during this period. CONCLUSION: Rotavirus G1P[8], the major strain in circulation during the pre-vaccination era, was replaced by G12P[8] as the most predominant strain after vaccine introduction. This strain replacement could be temporary and unrelated to vaccine introduction since an increase in G12 was observed in countries yet to introduce the rotavirus vaccine in West Africa. A continuous surveillance programme in the post-vaccine era is necessary for the monitoring of circulating rotavirus strains and the detection of unusual/emerging genotypes. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29371014/Rotavirus_strain_distribution_in_Ghana_pre__and_post__rotavirus_vaccine_introduction_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(18)30034-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -