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Impact of climate change on dermatological conditions related to flooding: update from the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee.
Int J Dermatol. 2018 Aug; 57(8):901-910.IJ

Abstract

Climate change contributes to the increase in severity and frequency of flooding, which is the most frequent and deadly disaster worldwide. Flood-related damage can be very severe and include health effects. Among those health impacts, dermatological diseases are one of the most frequently encountered. Both infectious and noninfectious dermatological conditions are increasing after flooding. We searched PubMed using the search term climate change OR global warming OR rainfall OR flooding OR skin. Articles published in the English-language literature were included. We also searched the International Society of Dermatology website library on climate change for additional articles. There is an increased risk of trauma during the course of a natural disaster. The majority of post-tsunami wound infections were polymicrobial, but gram-negative bacteria were the leading causes. Infectious diseases with dermatological manifestations, such as impetigo, leptospirosis, measles, dengue fever, tinea corporis, malaria, and leishmaniasis, are important causes of morbidity among flood-afflicted individuals. Insect bites and stings, and parasite infestations such as scabies and cutaneous larva migrans are also frequently observed. Inflammatory conditions including irritant contact dermatitis are among the leading dermatological conditions. Dermatological conditions such as alopecia areata, vitiligo, psoriasis, and urticaria can be induced or exacerbated by psychological conditions post disaster. Prevention is essential in the management of skin diseases because of flooding. Avoiding exposure to contaminated environments, wearing protective devices, rapid provision of clean water and sanitation facilities, prompt vector controls, and education about disease risk and prevention are important.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Muntinlupa City, Philippines.Department of Dermatology, Research Institute for Tropical Medicine, Muntinlupa City, Philippines.Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29377078

Citation

Dayrit, Johannes F., et al. "Impact of Climate Change On Dermatological Conditions Related to Flooding: Update From the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee." International Journal of Dermatology, vol. 57, no. 8, 2018, pp. 901-910.
Dayrit JF, Bintanjoyo L, Andersen LK, et al. Impact of climate change on dermatological conditions related to flooding: update from the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee. Int J Dermatol. 2018;57(8):901-910.
Dayrit, J. F., Bintanjoyo, L., Andersen, L. K., & Davis, M. D. P. (2018). Impact of climate change on dermatological conditions related to flooding: update from the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee. International Journal of Dermatology, 57(8), 901-910. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13901
Dayrit JF, et al. Impact of Climate Change On Dermatological Conditions Related to Flooding: Update From the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee. Int J Dermatol. 2018;57(8):901-910. PubMed PMID: 29377078.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of climate change on dermatological conditions related to flooding: update from the International Society of Dermatology Climate Change Committee. AU - Dayrit,Johannes F, AU - Bintanjoyo,Lunardi, AU - Andersen,Louise K, AU - Davis,Mark Dennis P, Y1 - 2018/01/29/ PY - 2017/10/24/received PY - 2017/11/09/revised PY - 2017/12/15/accepted PY - 2018/1/30/pubmed PY - 2018/11/16/medline PY - 2018/1/30/entrez SP - 901 EP - 910 JF - International journal of dermatology JO - Int J Dermatol VL - 57 IS - 8 N2 - Climate change contributes to the increase in severity and frequency of flooding, which is the most frequent and deadly disaster worldwide. Flood-related damage can be very severe and include health effects. Among those health impacts, dermatological diseases are one of the most frequently encountered. Both infectious and noninfectious dermatological conditions are increasing after flooding. We searched PubMed using the search term climate change OR global warming OR rainfall OR flooding OR skin. Articles published in the English-language literature were included. We also searched the International Society of Dermatology website library on climate change for additional articles. There is an increased risk of trauma during the course of a natural disaster. The majority of post-tsunami wound infections were polymicrobial, but gram-negative bacteria were the leading causes. Infectious diseases with dermatological manifestations, such as impetigo, leptospirosis, measles, dengue fever, tinea corporis, malaria, and leishmaniasis, are important causes of morbidity among flood-afflicted individuals. Insect bites and stings, and parasite infestations such as scabies and cutaneous larva migrans are also frequently observed. Inflammatory conditions including irritant contact dermatitis are among the leading dermatological conditions. Dermatological conditions such as alopecia areata, vitiligo, psoriasis, and urticaria can be induced or exacerbated by psychological conditions post disaster. Prevention is essential in the management of skin diseases because of flooding. Avoiding exposure to contaminated environments, wearing protective devices, rapid provision of clean water and sanitation facilities, prompt vector controls, and education about disease risk and prevention are important. SN - 1365-4632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29377078/Impact_of_climate_change_on_dermatological_conditions_related_to_flooding:_update_from_the_International_Society_of_Dermatology_Climate_Change_Committee_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ijd.13901 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -