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Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration.
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2018 09; 42(7):1185-1193.JJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The efficacy of different commercial beverage compositions for meeting oral rehydration therapy (ORT) goals in the treatment of acute dehydration in healthy humans has not been systematically tested. The objective of the study was to compare fluid retention, plasma volume (PV), and interstitial fluid (ISF) volume restoration when using 1 popular glucose-based and 1 novel amino acid-based (AA) commercial ORT beverage following experimental hypertonic or isotonic dehydration.

METHODS

Twenty-six healthy adults (21 males, 5 females) underwent either a controlled bout of hypertonic (n = 13) or isotonic (n = 13) dehydration (3%-4% body mass) via eccrine or renal body water and electrolyte losses induced using exercise-heat stress (EHS) or Lasix administration (LAS), respectively. Rehydration was achieved over 90 minutes by matching fluid intake to water losses (1:1) using a sports drink (SP) or AA commercial ORT beverage. Fluid retention (water and electrolytes), PV, and ISF volume changes were tracked for 180 minutes.

RESULTS

AA produced significantly (P <0.05) greater fluid retention (75% vs 57%), ISF volume restoration, and tended (P = 0.06) to produce greater PV restoration in trial EHS. In trial LAS, neither beverage exceeded 65% retention, but AA replaced electrolytes and preserved ISF volume better than SP (P <0.05).

CONCLUSION

The results of this study demonstrate superior rehydration when using AA compared with SP for both hypertonic and isotonic dehydration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA.Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Health Cancer Center, Cancer and Genetics Research, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29377181

Citation

Cheuvront, Samuel N., et al. "Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration." JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 42, no. 7, 2018, pp. 1185-1193.
Cheuvront SN, Kenefick RW, Charkoudian N, et al. Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2018;42(7):1185-1193.
Cheuvront, S. N., Kenefick, R. W., Charkoudian, N., Mitchell, K. M., Luippold, A. J., Bradbury, K. E., & Vidyasagar, S. (2018). Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration. JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 42(7), 1185-1193. https://doi.org/10.1002/jpen.1142
Cheuvront SN, et al. Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2018;42(7):1185-1193. PubMed PMID: 29377181.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Efficacy of Glucose or Amino Acid-Based Commercial Beverages in Meeting Oral Rehydration Therapy Goals After Acute Hypertonic and Isotonic Dehydration. AU - Cheuvront,Samuel N, AU - Kenefick,Robert W, AU - Charkoudian,Nisha, AU - Mitchell,Katherine M, AU - Luippold,Adam J, AU - Bradbury,Karleigh E, AU - Vidyasagar,Sadasivan, Y1 - 2018/01/28/ PY - 2017/09/13/received PY - 2017/11/30/accepted PY - 2018/1/30/pubmed PY - 2019/11/19/medline PY - 2018/1/30/entrez KW - diarrhea KW - diuretic KW - hypovolemia KW - sweat KW - volume depletion SP - 1185 EP - 1193 JF - JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition JO - JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr VL - 42 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The efficacy of different commercial beverage compositions for meeting oral rehydration therapy (ORT) goals in the treatment of acute dehydration in healthy humans has not been systematically tested. The objective of the study was to compare fluid retention, plasma volume (PV), and interstitial fluid (ISF) volume restoration when using 1 popular glucose-based and 1 novel amino acid-based (AA) commercial ORT beverage following experimental hypertonic or isotonic dehydration. METHODS: Twenty-six healthy adults (21 males, 5 females) underwent either a controlled bout of hypertonic (n = 13) or isotonic (n = 13) dehydration (3%-4% body mass) via eccrine or renal body water and electrolyte losses induced using exercise-heat stress (EHS) or Lasix administration (LAS), respectively. Rehydration was achieved over 90 minutes by matching fluid intake to water losses (1:1) using a sports drink (SP) or AA commercial ORT beverage. Fluid retention (water and electrolytes), PV, and ISF volume changes were tracked for 180 minutes. RESULTS: AA produced significantly (P <0.05) greater fluid retention (75% vs 57%), ISF volume restoration, and tended (P = 0.06) to produce greater PV restoration in trial EHS. In trial LAS, neither beverage exceeded 65% retention, but AA replaced electrolytes and preserved ISF volume better than SP (P <0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate superior rehydration when using AA compared with SP for both hypertonic and isotonic dehydration. SN - 1941-2444 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29377181/Efficacy_of_Glucose_or_Amino_Acid_Based_Commercial_Beverages_in_Meeting_Oral_Rehydration_Therapy_Goals_After_Acute_Hypertonic_and_Isotonic_Dehydration_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jpen.1142 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -