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Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization.
AJS. 2017 May; 122(6):1939-1988.AJS

Abstract

Drawing on the social disorganization tradition and the social ecological perspective of Jane Jacobs, the authors hypothesize that neighborhoods composed of residents who intersect in space more frequently as a result of routine activities will exhibit higher levels of collective efficacy, intergenerational closure, and social network interaction and exchange. They develop this approach employing the concept of ecological networks-two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through spatial overlap in routine activities. Using data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, they find evidence that econetwork extensity (the average proportion of households in the neighborhood to which a given household is tied through any location) and intensity (the degree to which household dyads are characterized by ties through multiple locations) are positively related to changes in social organization between 2000-2001 and 2006-2008. These findings demonstrate the relevance of econetwork characteristics-heretofore neglected in research on urban neighborhoods-for consequential dimensions of neighborhood social organization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ohio State University.Ohio State University.University of New Mexico.University of New Mexico.Ohio State University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29379218

Citation

Browning, Christopher R., et al. "Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization." AJS; American Journal of Sociology, vol. 122, no. 6, 2017, pp. 1939-1988.
Browning CR, Calder CA, Soller B, et al. Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization. Am J Sociol. 2017;122(6):1939-1988.
Browning, C. R., Calder, C. A., Soller, B., Jackson, A. L., & Dirlam, J. (2017). Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization. AJS; American Journal of Sociology, 122(6), 1939-1988. https://doi.org/10.1086/691261
Browning CR, et al. Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization. Am J Sociol. 2017;122(6):1939-1988. PubMed PMID: 29379218.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ecological Networks and Neighborhood Social Organization. AU - Browning,Christopher R, AU - Calder,Catherine A, AU - Soller,Brian, AU - Jackson,Aubrey L, AU - Dirlam,Jonathan, PY - 2018/1/31/entrez PY - 2018/1/31/pubmed PY - 2018/7/17/medline SP - 1939 EP - 1988 JF - AJS; American journal of sociology JO - Am. J. Sociol. VL - 122 IS - 6 N2 - Drawing on the social disorganization tradition and the social ecological perspective of Jane Jacobs, the authors hypothesize that neighborhoods composed of residents who intersect in space more frequently as a result of routine activities will exhibit higher levels of collective efficacy, intergenerational closure, and social network interaction and exchange. They develop this approach employing the concept of ecological networks-two-mode networks that indirectly link residents through spatial overlap in routine activities. Using data from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey, they find evidence that econetwork extensity (the average proportion of households in the neighborhood to which a given household is tied through any location) and intensity (the degree to which household dyads are characterized by ties through multiple locations) are positively related to changes in social organization between 2000-2001 and 2006-2008. These findings demonstrate the relevance of econetwork characteristics-heretofore neglected in research on urban neighborhoods-for consequential dimensions of neighborhood social organization. SN - 0002-9602 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29379218/Ecological_Networks_and_Neighborhood_Social_Organization L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/29379218/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -