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A randomized controlled trial of financial incentives to low income pregnant women to engage in smoking cessation treatment: Effects on post-birth abstinence.
J Consult Clin Psychol. 2018 05; 86(5):464-473.JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Evaluate the effectiveness of monetary incentives for increasing engagement in smoking cessation treatment and improving 6-month abstinence in low-income pregnant smokers.

METHOD

Two-group randomized clinical trial recruiting low-income (Medicaid-registered) pregnant smokers receiving assistance through a perinatal support program. Participants were randomized to either an incentive (n = 505) or control condition (n = 509). All participants were offered identical smoking cessation counseling at contacts. Incentive condition participants received incentives for attending pre- and postbirth treatment contacts: $25 for each of 6 prebirth provider visits, $25-40 for each of 4 postbirth home visits at Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 (total = $130), $20 for each of 5 postbirth counseling calls and $40 for biochemically verified abstinence at the Week 1 and 6-month visits. Control condition participants received only $40 for attendance at the Week 1 and 6-month postbirth visits ($40 each).

MAIN OUTCOMES

Primary outcome was biochemically confirmed 7-day point-prevalence abstinence at 6-month postbirth follow-up. Secondary outcomes included number of home visits and phone calls taken over the first 6 months postbirth; biochemically confirmed abstinence at postbirth Week 1 visit; and self-reported smoking status at 2- and 4-month visits.

RESULTS

Incentive condition participants had a higher biochemically confirmed abstinence rate at 6-month postbirth than controls (14.7% vs. 9.2%, respectively: p < .01). This effect was mediated by incentive condition participants' greater acceptance of postbirth home visits and counseling calls.

CONCLUSIONS

Moderate incentive payments for smoking treatment engagement (a mean of ≈$214 paid) increased low-income pregnant smokers' engagement and success in smoking cessation treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.Wisconsin Women's Health Foundation.Wisconsin Women's Health Foundation.Wisconsin Women's Health Foundation.Wisconsin Department of Health Services.Center for Tobacco Research and Intervention, University of Wisconsin.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29389142

Citation

Baker, Timothy B., et al. "A Randomized Controlled Trial of Financial Incentives to Low Income Pregnant Women to Engage in Smoking Cessation Treatment: Effects On Post-birth Abstinence." Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, vol. 86, no. 5, 2018, pp. 464-473.
Baker TB, Fraser DL, Kobinsky K, et al. A randomized controlled trial of financial incentives to low income pregnant women to engage in smoking cessation treatment: Effects on post-birth abstinence. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2018;86(5):464-473.
Baker, T. B., Fraser, D. L., Kobinsky, K., Adsit, R., Smith, S. S., Khalil, L., Alaniz, K. M., Sullivan, T. E., Johnson, M. L., & Fiore, M. C. (2018). A randomized controlled trial of financial incentives to low income pregnant women to engage in smoking cessation treatment: Effects on post-birth abstinence. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 86(5), 464-473. https://doi.org/10.1037/ccp0000278
Baker TB, et al. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Financial Incentives to Low Income Pregnant Women to Engage in Smoking Cessation Treatment: Effects On Post-birth Abstinence. J Consult Clin Psychol. 2018;86(5):464-473. PubMed PMID: 29389142.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized controlled trial of financial incentives to low income pregnant women to engage in smoking cessation treatment: Effects on post-birth abstinence. AU - Baker,Timothy B, AU - Fraser,David L, AU - Kobinsky,Kate, AU - Adsit,Robert, AU - Smith,Stevens S, AU - Khalil,Lisette, AU - Alaniz,Kristine M, AU - Sullivan,Tingting E, AU - Johnson,Mimi L, AU - Fiore,Michael C, Y1 - 2018/02/01/ PY - 2018/2/2/pubmed PY - 2019/7/4/medline PY - 2018/2/2/entrez SP - 464 EP - 473 JF - Journal of consulting and clinical psychology JO - J Consult Clin Psychol VL - 86 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Evaluate the effectiveness of monetary incentives for increasing engagement in smoking cessation treatment and improving 6-month abstinence in low-income pregnant smokers. METHOD: Two-group randomized clinical trial recruiting low-income (Medicaid-registered) pregnant smokers receiving assistance through a perinatal support program. Participants were randomized to either an incentive (n = 505) or control condition (n = 509). All participants were offered identical smoking cessation counseling at contacts. Incentive condition participants received incentives for attending pre- and postbirth treatment contacts: $25 for each of 6 prebirth provider visits, $25-40 for each of 4 postbirth home visits at Weeks 1, 2, 4, and 6 (total = $130), $20 for each of 5 postbirth counseling calls and $40 for biochemically verified abstinence at the Week 1 and 6-month visits. Control condition participants received only $40 for attendance at the Week 1 and 6-month postbirth visits ($40 each). MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary outcome was biochemically confirmed 7-day point-prevalence abstinence at 6-month postbirth follow-up. Secondary outcomes included number of home visits and phone calls taken over the first 6 months postbirth; biochemically confirmed abstinence at postbirth Week 1 visit; and self-reported smoking status at 2- and 4-month visits. RESULTS: Incentive condition participants had a higher biochemically confirmed abstinence rate at 6-month postbirth than controls (14.7% vs. 9.2%, respectively: p < .01). This effect was mediated by incentive condition participants' greater acceptance of postbirth home visits and counseling calls. CONCLUSIONS: Moderate incentive payments for smoking treatment engagement (a mean of ≈$214 paid) increased low-income pregnant smokers' engagement and success in smoking cessation treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record SN - 1939-2117 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29389142/A_randomized_controlled_trial_of_financial_incentives_to_low_income_pregnant_women_to_engage_in_smoking_cessation_treatment:_Effects_on_post_birth_abstinence_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/ccp/86/5/464 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -