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The prevalence of Middle East respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in livestock and temporal relation to locations and seasons.
J Infect Public Health. 2018 Nov - Dec; 11(6):884-888.JI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) has been reported for the first time infecting a human being since 2012. The WHO was notified of 27 countries have reported cases of MERS, the majority of these cases occur in the Arabian Peninsula, particularly in Saudi Arabia. Dromedary camels are likely to be the main source of Middle East respiratory syndrome virus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans.

METHODS

MERS-CoV infection rates among camels in livestock markets and slaughterhouses were investigated in Saudi Arabia. A total of 698 nasal swabs were collected and examined with Rapid assay and rtRT-PCR. Ten MERS-CoV positive samples were subjected to full genomic sequencing. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of the Rapid immunochromatographic assay (BioNote, South Korea) was evaluated as a diagnostic tool for MERS-CoV compared to rtRT-PCR.

RESULTS

The results showed a high percentage of dromedaries (56.4%) had evidence for nasal MERS-CoV infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the ten MERS-CoV isolates showed that the sequences were closely related to the other MERS-CoV strains recovered from camels and human cases. Moreover, the results showed that 195 samples were positive for MERS-CoV by rapid assay compared to 394 positive samples of rtRT-PCR, which showed low rapid assay sensitivity (49.49%) while, the specificity were found to be 100%.

CONCLUSION

These findings indicate that these sites are a highly-hazardous to zoonotic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Health and Monitoring, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia; Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh,El-Geish Street, 33516, Egypt. Electronic address: Samy.kassem@vet.kfs.edu.eg.Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Health and Monitoring, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Health and Monitoring, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Laboratory, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Laboratory, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Health and Monitoring, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Services, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Veterinary Health and Monitoring, Ministry of Environment, Water and Agriculture,65 King Abdulaziz Road, Riyadh, 11195, Saudi Arabia.Department of Virology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kafrelsheikh University, Kafrelsheikh,El-Geish Street, 33516, Egypt.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29396257

Citation

Kasem, Samy, et al. "The Prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Infection in Livestock and Temporal Relation to Locations and Seasons." Journal of Infection and Public Health, vol. 11, no. 6, 2018, pp. 884-888.
Kasem S, Qasim I, Al-Doweriej A, et al. The prevalence of Middle East respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in livestock and temporal relation to locations and seasons. J Infect Public Health. 2018;11(6):884-888.
Kasem, S., Qasim, I., Al-Doweriej, A., Hashim, O., Alkarar, A., Abu-Obeida, A., Saleh, M., Al-Hofufi, A., Al-Ghadier, H., Hussien, R., Al-Sahaf, A., Bayoumi, F., & Magouz, A. (2018). The prevalence of Middle East respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in livestock and temporal relation to locations and seasons. Journal of Infection and Public Health, 11(6), 884-888. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2018.01.004
Kasem S, et al. The Prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Infection in Livestock and Temporal Relation to Locations and Seasons. J Infect Public Health. 2018 Nov - Dec;11(6):884-888. PubMed PMID: 29396257.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The prevalence of Middle East respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in livestock and temporal relation to locations and seasons. AU - Kasem,Samy, AU - Qasim,Ibrahim, AU - Al-Doweriej,Ali, AU - Hashim,Osman, AU - Alkarar,Ali, AU - Abu-Obeida,Ali, AU - Saleh,Mohamed, AU - Al-Hofufi,Ali, AU - Al-Ghadier,Hussein, AU - Hussien,Raed, AU - Al-Sahaf,Ali, AU - Bayoumi,Faisal, AU - Magouz,Asmaa, Y1 - 2018/02/01/ PY - 2017/09/27/received PY - 2018/01/03/revised PY - 2018/01/09/accepted PY - 2018/2/6/pubmed PY - 2018/12/18/medline PY - 2018/2/4/entrez KW - Livestock markets KW - MERS KW - Saudi Arabia KW - Slaughterhouses SP - 884 EP - 888 JF - Journal of infection and public health JO - J Infect Public Health VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) has been reported for the first time infecting a human being since 2012. The WHO was notified of 27 countries have reported cases of MERS, the majority of these cases occur in the Arabian Peninsula, particularly in Saudi Arabia. Dromedary camels are likely to be the main source of Middle East respiratory syndrome virus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans. METHODS: MERS-CoV infection rates among camels in livestock markets and slaughterhouses were investigated in Saudi Arabia. A total of 698 nasal swabs were collected and examined with Rapid assay and rtRT-PCR. Ten MERS-CoV positive samples were subjected to full genomic sequencing. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of the Rapid immunochromatographic assay (BioNote, South Korea) was evaluated as a diagnostic tool for MERS-CoV compared to rtRT-PCR. RESULTS: The results showed a high percentage of dromedaries (56.4%) had evidence for nasal MERS-CoV infection. Phylogenetic analysis of the ten MERS-CoV isolates showed that the sequences were closely related to the other MERS-CoV strains recovered from camels and human cases. Moreover, the results showed that 195 samples were positive for MERS-CoV by rapid assay compared to 394 positive samples of rtRT-PCR, which showed low rapid assay sensitivity (49.49%) while, the specificity were found to be 100%. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that these sites are a highly-hazardous to zoonotic diseases. SN - 1876-035X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29396257/The_prevalence_of_Middle_East_respiratory_Syndrome_coronavirus__MERS_CoV__infection_in_livestock_and_temporal_relation_to_locations_and_seasons_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1876-0341(18)30005-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -