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Personal social networks and organizational affiliation of South Asians in the United States.
BMC Public Health. 2018 02 05; 18(1):218.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Understanding the social lives of South Asian immigrants in the United States (U.S) and their influence on health can inform interpersonal and community-level health interventions for this growing community. This paper describe the rationale, survey design, measurement, and network properties of 700 South Asian individuals in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) social networks ancillary study.

METHODS

MASALA is a community-based cohort, established in 2010, to understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease among South Asians living in the U.S. Survey data collection on personal social networks occurred between 2014 and 2017. Network measurements included size, composition, density, and organizational affiliations. Data on participants' self-rated health and social support functions and health-related discussions among network members were also collected.

RESULTS

Participants' age ranged from 44 to 84 (average 59 years), and 57% were men. South Asians had large (size=5.6, SD=2.6), kin-centered (proportion kin=0.71, SD=0.28), and dense networks. Affiliation with religious and spiritual organizations was perceived as beneficial to health. Emotional closeness with network members was positively associated with participants' self-rated health (p-value <0.001), and networks with higher density and more kin were significantly associated with health-related discussions.

DISCUSSION

The MASALA networks study advances research on the cultural patterning of social relationships and sources of social support in South Asians living in the U.S. Future analyses will examine how personal social networks and organizational affiliations influence South Asians' health behaviors and outcomes.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02268513.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. nkandula@nm.org. Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. nkandula@nm.org. Northwestern University, 420 E. Superior Street, 6th Floor, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. nkandula@nm.org.Feinberg School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Medicine and Public Health Sciences and the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.Division of Health Promotion & Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX, USA.Division of General Internal Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Pathology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Pediatrics, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29402246

Citation

Kandula, Namratha R., et al. "Personal Social Networks and Organizational Affiliation of South Asians in the United States." BMC Public Health, vol. 18, no. 1, 2018, p. 218.
Kandula NR, Cooper AJ, Schneider JA, et al. Personal social networks and organizational affiliation of South Asians in the United States. BMC Public Health. 2018;18(1):218.
Kandula, N. R., Cooper, A. J., Schneider, J. A., Fujimoto, K., Kanaya, A. M., Van Horn, L., deKoning, L., & Siddique, J. (2018). Personal social networks and organizational affiliation of South Asians in the United States. BMC Public Health, 18(1), 218. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5128-z
Kandula NR, et al. Personal Social Networks and Organizational Affiliation of South Asians in the United States. BMC Public Health. 2018 02 5;18(1):218. PubMed PMID: 29402246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Personal social networks and organizational affiliation of South Asians in the United States. AU - Kandula,Namratha R, AU - Cooper,Andrew J, AU - Schneider,John A, AU - Fujimoto,Kayo, AU - Kanaya,Alka M, AU - Van Horn,Linda, AU - deKoning,Lawrence, AU - Siddique,Juned, Y1 - 2018/02/05/ PY - 2017/09/13/received PY - 2018/01/29/accepted PY - 2018/2/7/entrez PY - 2018/2/7/pubmed PY - 2018/6/15/medline KW - Asian American KW - Health KW - Health-related decision making KW - Self-rated health KW - Social networks KW - Social support SP - 218 EP - 218 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Understanding the social lives of South Asian immigrants in the United States (U.S) and their influence on health can inform interpersonal and community-level health interventions for this growing community. This paper describe the rationale, survey design, measurement, and network properties of 700 South Asian individuals in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America (MASALA) social networks ancillary study. METHODS: MASALA is a community-based cohort, established in 2010, to understand risk factors for cardiovascular disease among South Asians living in the U.S. Survey data collection on personal social networks occurred between 2014 and 2017. Network measurements included size, composition, density, and organizational affiliations. Data on participants' self-rated health and social support functions and health-related discussions among network members were also collected. RESULTS: Participants' age ranged from 44 to 84 (average 59 years), and 57% were men. South Asians had large (size=5.6, SD=2.6), kin-centered (proportion kin=0.71, SD=0.28), and dense networks. Affiliation with religious and spiritual organizations was perceived as beneficial to health. Emotional closeness with network members was positively associated with participants' self-rated health (p-value <0.001), and networks with higher density and more kin were significantly associated with health-related discussions. DISCUSSION: The MASALA networks study advances research on the cultural patterning of social relationships and sources of social support in South Asians living in the U.S. Future analyses will examine how personal social networks and organizational affiliations influence South Asians' health behaviors and outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02268513. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29402246/Personal_social_networks_and_organizational_affiliation_of_South_Asians_in_the_United_States_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-018-5128-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -