Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

What "likes" have got to do with it: Exposure to peers' alcohol-related posts and perceptions of injunctive drinking norms.
J Am Coll Health. 2018 May-Jun; 66(4):252-258.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Examine 1) whether observed social reinforcements (i.e., "likes") received by peers' alcohol-related social media posts are related to first-year college students' perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking behaviors; and 2) whether associations are moderated by students' alcohol use status.

PARTICIPANTS

First-year university students (N = 296) completed an online survey in September, 2014.

METHOD

Participants reported their own alcohol use, friends' alcohol use, perceptions of the typical student's approval for risky drinking, and ranked 10 types of social media posts in terms of the relative numbers of "likes" received when posted by peers.

RESULTS

Observed social reinforcement (i.e., "likes") for peers' alcohol-related posts predicted perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking behaviors among non-drinking students, but not drinking students.

CONCLUSIONS

For first-year college students who have not yet initiated drinking, observing peers' alcohol-related posts to receive abundant "likes" may increase perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Psychology , Loyola Marymount University , Los Angeles , California , USA.a Department of Psychology , Loyola Marymount University , Los Angeles , California , USA.a Department of Psychology , Loyola Marymount University , Los Angeles , California , USA.a Department of Psychology , Loyola Marymount University , Los Angeles , California , USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29405864

Citation

Boyle, Sarah C., et al. "What "likes" Have Got to Do With It: Exposure to Peers' Alcohol-related Posts and Perceptions of Injunctive Drinking Norms." Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, vol. 66, no. 4, 2018, pp. 252-258.
Boyle SC, Smith DJ, Earle AM, et al. What "likes" have got to do with it: Exposure to peers' alcohol-related posts and perceptions of injunctive drinking norms. J Am Coll Health. 2018;66(4):252-258.
Boyle, S. C., Smith, D. J., Earle, A. M., & LaBrie, J. W. (2018). What "likes" have got to do with it: Exposure to peers' alcohol-related posts and perceptions of injunctive drinking norms. Journal of American College Health : J of ACH, 66(4), 252-258. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2018.1431895
Boyle SC, et al. What "likes" Have Got to Do With It: Exposure to Peers' Alcohol-related Posts and Perceptions of Injunctive Drinking Norms. J Am Coll Health. 2018 May-Jun;66(4):252-258. PubMed PMID: 29405864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - What "likes" have got to do with it: Exposure to peers' alcohol-related posts and perceptions of injunctive drinking norms. AU - Boyle,Sarah C, AU - Smith,Daniel J, AU - Earle,Andrew M, AU - LaBrie,Joseph W, Y1 - 2018/03/12/ PY - 2018/2/7/pubmed PY - 2019/6/14/medline PY - 2018/2/7/entrez KW - Alcohol KW - college students KW - norms KW - social media SP - 252 EP - 258 JF - Journal of American college health : J of ACH JO - J Am Coll Health VL - 66 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Examine 1) whether observed social reinforcements (i.e., "likes") received by peers' alcohol-related social media posts are related to first-year college students' perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking behaviors; and 2) whether associations are moderated by students' alcohol use status. PARTICIPANTS: First-year university students (N = 296) completed an online survey in September, 2014. METHOD: Participants reported their own alcohol use, friends' alcohol use, perceptions of the typical student's approval for risky drinking, and ranked 10 types of social media posts in terms of the relative numbers of "likes" received when posted by peers. RESULTS: Observed social reinforcement (i.e., "likes") for peers' alcohol-related posts predicted perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking behaviors among non-drinking students, but not drinking students. CONCLUSIONS: For first-year college students who have not yet initiated drinking, observing peers' alcohol-related posts to receive abundant "likes" may increase perceptions of peer approval for risky drinking. SN - 1940-3208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29405864/What_"likes"_have_got_to_do_with_it:_Exposure_to_peers'_alcohol_related_posts_and_perceptions_of_injunctive_drinking_norms_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07448481.2018.1431895 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -