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Dengue virus infection among long-term travelers from the Netherlands: A prospective study, 2008-2011.
PLoS One. 2018; 13(2):e0192193.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dengue is increasing rapidly in endemic regions. Data on incidence among travelers to these areas are limited. Five prospective studies have been performed thus far, mainly among short-term travelers.

OBJECTIVE

To obtain the attack and incidence rate (AR, IR) of dengue virus (DENV) infection among long-term travelers and identify associated risk factors.

METHODS

A prospective study was performed among long-term travelers (12-52 weeks) attending the Public Health Service in Amsterdam. Clients planning to travel to (sub)tropical countries were invited to participate. Participants kept a travel diary, recording itinerary, symptoms, and physician visits. Pre- and post-travel blood samples were serologically tested for the presence of Anti-DENV IgG antibodies. Seroconversion was considered suggestive of a primary DENV infection. Anti-DENV IgG present in both corresponding samples in combination with a post-/pre-travel ratio of ≥4:1 was suggestive of a secondary infection. Risk factors for a DENV infection were studied using poisson regression.

RESULTS

In total, 600 participants were included; median age was 25 years (IQR: 23-29), 35.5% were male, and median travel duration was 20 weeks (IQR: 15-25). In 39 of 600 participants (AR: 6.5%; 95% CI 4.5-8.5%) anti-DENV IgG test results were suggestive of a recent infection, yielding an IR of 13.9 per 1,000 person-months traveling (95%CI: 9.9-19.1). No secondary infections were found. IR for Asia, Africa, and America were comparable and 13.5, 15.8, and 13.6 per 1,000 person-months respectively. Of participants with a recent DENV infection, 51% did not report dengue-like illness (DLI) or fever, but 10% were hospitalized. In multivariable analysis, travelers who seroconverted were significantly more likely to be vaccinated with ≥2 flavivirus vaccines for the current trip or to have reported DLI in >1 consecutive weeks.

CONCLUSIONS

Long-term travelers are at substantial risk of DENV infection. Half of those with a DENV infection reported no symptoms, but 10% were hospitalized, demonstrating the importance of advising anti-mosquito measures during travel.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Infectious Diseases, Public Health Service (GGD), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. National Coordination Centre for Traveller's Health Advice (LCR), Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Department of Medical Microbiology, Laboratory of Clinical Virology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Department of Infectious Diseases Research and Prevention, Public Health Service (GGD), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Amsterdam Infection & Immunity Institute (AI&II), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Department of Infectious Diseases Research and Prevention, Public Health Service (GGD), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Amsterdam Infection & Immunity Institute (AI&II), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.Department of Infectious Diseases, Public Health Service (GGD), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. National Coordination Centre for Traveller's Health Advice (LCR), Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Tropical Medicine and AIDS, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29415063

Citation

Overbosch, Femke W., et al. "Dengue Virus Infection Among Long-term Travelers From the Netherlands: a Prospective Study, 2008-2011." PloS One, vol. 13, no. 2, 2018, pp. e0192193.
Overbosch FW, Schinkel J, Stolte IG, et al. Dengue virus infection among long-term travelers from the Netherlands: A prospective study, 2008-2011. PLoS One. 2018;13(2):e0192193.
Overbosch, F. W., Schinkel, J., Stolte, I. G., Prins, M., & Sonder, G. J. B. (2018). Dengue virus infection among long-term travelers from the Netherlands: A prospective study, 2008-2011. PloS One, 13(2), e0192193. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192193
Overbosch FW, et al. Dengue Virus Infection Among Long-term Travelers From the Netherlands: a Prospective Study, 2008-2011. PLoS One. 2018;13(2):e0192193. PubMed PMID: 29415063.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dengue virus infection among long-term travelers from the Netherlands: A prospective study, 2008-2011. AU - Overbosch,Femke W, AU - Schinkel,Janke, AU - Stolte,Ineke G, AU - Prins,Maria, AU - Sonder,Gerard J B, Y1 - 2018/02/07/ PY - 2017/09/15/received PY - 2018/01/19/accepted PY - 2018/2/8/entrez PY - 2018/2/8/pubmed PY - 2018/3/20/medline SP - e0192193 EP - e0192193 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 13 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dengue is increasing rapidly in endemic regions. Data on incidence among travelers to these areas are limited. Five prospective studies have been performed thus far, mainly among short-term travelers. OBJECTIVE: To obtain the attack and incidence rate (AR, IR) of dengue virus (DENV) infection among long-term travelers and identify associated risk factors. METHODS: A prospective study was performed among long-term travelers (12-52 weeks) attending the Public Health Service in Amsterdam. Clients planning to travel to (sub)tropical countries were invited to participate. Participants kept a travel diary, recording itinerary, symptoms, and physician visits. Pre- and post-travel blood samples were serologically tested for the presence of Anti-DENV IgG antibodies. Seroconversion was considered suggestive of a primary DENV infection. Anti-DENV IgG present in both corresponding samples in combination with a post-/pre-travel ratio of ≥4:1 was suggestive of a secondary infection. Risk factors for a DENV infection were studied using poisson regression. RESULTS: In total, 600 participants were included; median age was 25 years (IQR: 23-29), 35.5% were male, and median travel duration was 20 weeks (IQR: 15-25). In 39 of 600 participants (AR: 6.5%; 95% CI 4.5-8.5%) anti-DENV IgG test results were suggestive of a recent infection, yielding an IR of 13.9 per 1,000 person-months traveling (95%CI: 9.9-19.1). No secondary infections were found. IR for Asia, Africa, and America were comparable and 13.5, 15.8, and 13.6 per 1,000 person-months respectively. Of participants with a recent DENV infection, 51% did not report dengue-like illness (DLI) or fever, but 10% were hospitalized. In multivariable analysis, travelers who seroconverted were significantly more likely to be vaccinated with ≥2 flavivirus vaccines for the current trip or to have reported DLI in >1 consecutive weeks. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term travelers are at substantial risk of DENV infection. Half of those with a DENV infection reported no symptoms, but 10% were hospitalized, demonstrating the importance of advising anti-mosquito measures during travel. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29415063/Dengue_virus_infection_among_long_term_travelers_from_the_Netherlands:_A_prospective_study_2008_2011_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0192193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -