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Paternal and maternal obesity but not gestational weight gain is associated with type 1 diabetes.
Int J Epidemiol 2018; 47(2):417-426IJ

Abstract

Background

Our objective was to examine the associations of parental body mass index (BMI) and maternal gestational weight gain with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. Comparing the associations of maternal and paternal BMI with type 1 diabetes in the offspring will provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding by characteristics linked to BMI in both parents.

Methods

We studied 132 331 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) who were born between February 1998 and July 2009. Exposures of interest included parental BMI and maternal gestational weight gain obtained by maternal report. We used Cox-proportional hazards regression to examine the risk of type 1 diabetes (n=499 cases), which was ascertained by national childhood diabetes registers.

Results

The incidence of type 1 diabetes was 32.7 per 100 000 person-years in MoBa and 28.5 per 100 000 person-years in DNBC. Both maternal pre-pregnancy obesity, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.89] and paternal obesity, adjusted HR 1.51 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.04), were associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. The associations were similar after mutual adjustment. In contrast, maternal total gestational weight gain was not associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes, adjusted HR 1.00 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.02) per kilogram increase.

Conclusions

Our study suggests that the association between maternal obesity and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is not likely explained by intrauterine mechanisms, but possibly rather by unknown environmental factors influencing BMI in the family.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Bristol, UK.Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.Centre for Fetal Programming, Department of Epidemiology Research, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.Division for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.MRC Integrative Epidemiology Unit at University of Bristol, Bristol, UK. Department of Population Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Bristol, UK. NIHR Bristol Biomedical Research Centre at the University Hospitals Bristol, NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.Department of Pediatrics, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.Department of Pediatrics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. KG Jebsen Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.Division for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Department of Pediatrics, Ostfold Hospital Trust, Fredrikstad, Norway.Division for Mental and Physical Health, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29415279

Citation

Magnus, Maria C., et al. "Paternal and Maternal Obesity but Not Gestational Weight Gain Is Associated With Type 1 Diabetes." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 47, no. 2, 2018, pp. 417-426.
Magnus MC, Olsen SF, Granstrom C, et al. Paternal and maternal obesity but not gestational weight gain is associated with type 1 diabetes. Int J Epidemiol. 2018;47(2):417-426.
Magnus, M. C., Olsen, S. F., Granstrom, C., Lund-Blix, N. A., Svensson, J., Johannesen, J., ... Stene, L. C. (2018). Paternal and maternal obesity but not gestational weight gain is associated with type 1 diabetes. International Journal of Epidemiology, 47(2), pp. 417-426. doi:10.1093/ije/dyx266.
Magnus MC, et al. Paternal and Maternal Obesity but Not Gestational Weight Gain Is Associated With Type 1 Diabetes. Int J Epidemiol. 2018 04 1;47(2):417-426. PubMed PMID: 29415279.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paternal and maternal obesity but not gestational weight gain is associated with type 1 diabetes. AU - Magnus,Maria C, AU - Olsen,Sjurdur F, AU - Granstrom,Charlotta, AU - Lund-Blix,Nicolai A, AU - Svensson,Jannet, AU - Johannesen,Jesper, AU - Fraser,Abigail, AU - Skrivarhaug,Torild, AU - Joner,Geir, AU - Njølstad,Pål R, AU - Størdal,Ketil, AU - Stene,Lars C, PY - 2017/12/06/accepted PY - 2018/2/8/pubmed PY - 2019/3/5/medline PY - 2018/2/8/entrez SP - 417 EP - 426 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - Background: Our objective was to examine the associations of parental body mass index (BMI) and maternal gestational weight gain with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. Comparing the associations of maternal and paternal BMI with type 1 diabetes in the offspring will provide further insight into the role of unmeasured confounding by characteristics linked to BMI in both parents. Methods: We studied 132 331 children participating in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) and the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC) who were born between February 1998 and July 2009. Exposures of interest included parental BMI and maternal gestational weight gain obtained by maternal report. We used Cox-proportional hazards regression to examine the risk of type 1 diabetes (n=499 cases), which was ascertained by national childhood diabetes registers. Results: The incidence of type 1 diabetes was 32.7 per 100 000 person-years in MoBa and 28.5 per 100 000 person-years in DNBC. Both maternal pre-pregnancy obesity, adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.41 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.89] and paternal obesity, adjusted HR 1.51 (95% CI: 1.11, 2.04), were associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes. The associations were similar after mutual adjustment. In contrast, maternal total gestational weight gain was not associated with childhood-onset type 1 diabetes, adjusted HR 1.00 (95% CI: 0.99, 1.02) per kilogram increase. Conclusions: Our study suggests that the association between maternal obesity and childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is not likely explained by intrauterine mechanisms, but possibly rather by unknown environmental factors influencing BMI in the family. SN - 1464-3685 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29415279/Paternal_and_maternal_obesity_but_not_gestational_weight_gain_is_associated_with_type_1_diabetes_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyx266 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -